72 documents found in 181ms
# 1
Willmes, Christian • Yener, Yasa • Gilgenberg, Anton • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: The Collaborative Research Centre 806 database (CRC806-Database, http://crc806db.uni-koeln.de) is online and operating since 2011. The architecture consists of a Typo3 based website frontend, a CKAN based metadata storage and an OGC compliant Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). It was decided to update the system with some major changes to the overall architecture, by preserving the current API functionality and the URLs of the datasets in the database. This paper describes the system architecture of the partly new implementation of the CRC806-Database. The SDI part of the system is migrated from the current MapServer, GeoServer, MapProxy and pyCSW based implementation to a GeoNode based system. Additionally the Typo3 based frontend of the web portal is changed to use mostly server side Extbase and Fluid based content handling and rendering, instead of the current AgularJS based frontend. Due to stability and consistency difficulties of client side rendering we decided to build a more robust system and move to server side rendering. The reasons for migrating to GeoNode for the SDI stack and away from JavaScript based client side to a server side rendering are discussed by taking into account pro and contra of both approaches, as well as a list of lessons learned from the ongoing development and operation of the CRC806-Database.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 115-126
# 2
Weber, Andreas • Piesche, Claudia
Abstract: The discussion about appropriate long-term accessibility of research results has gained importance. Especially, the requirements concerning the long-term preservation of research data from research projects funded, for instance, by the DFG have to be taken into account. While portals for globally standardised research data, e.g. climate data, are available, there is currently no provision for the large amount of data resulting from specialised research in individual research foci. In these cases, the requirements for longterm preservation have to be met by local solutions. In addition to the permanent storage of primary data and associated metadata, important steps of the genesis and the transformation process of published research results should also be incorporated into these individual solutions. Within the scope of the sub-project ‘INF Z2’ of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 840, an infrastructure is designed that permits long-term preservation and retrieval of research data created within the CRC. Additionally, it allows for the reconstruction of the genesis of published research results.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 103-114
# 3
Stamnas, Erasmia • Lammert, Andrea • Winkelmann, Volker • Grützun, Verena • Lang, Ulrich • (et. al.)
Abstract: Central Europe is a region with one of the most comprehensive networks for cloud and precipitation observations worldwide. Unifying these observations to become an ‚easy-to-use‘ data base and make it accessible to the climate community, is one of the goals of D(CP)². Therefore widely scattered observation data have to be organised, ranging from multivariate, long-term observations at dedicated supersites, to short-term area-wide remote sensing observations, up to high resolution satellite data. HD(CP)² has established a structure of distributed data servers with a common web portal as the global entry point. The central administration of these servers is based on a hierarchical data management system called Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS) from Unidata, which is also used by the ESGF and the ARM program. To ensure that observation data from the multitude of instrument types can be used in a uniform manner, we have developed the HD(CP)² Data Product Standard. This document describes the binding conventions for the datasets, i.e. file names and formats, variable names and metadata conventions which shall apply to data sets and associated metadata intended for HD(CP)². The data files are provided in NetCDF format, following the principles given in the NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata conventions, version 1.6, as far as possible. For the generation of metadata files, encoded in XML, HD(CP)² has developed its own web based Metadata Editor.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 95-101
# 4
Sahle, Patrick • Kronenwett, Simone
Abstract: Research on digital humanities results not only in ‘data’ but more often in complex forms of presentation which could be called ‘resources’ and which should be maintained over a long period of time. Thus, generic data archives are not a comprehensive answer to all questions concerning sustainability of these resources. Instead, dedicated humanities data centers are needed to care for research data management, data preservation and curation and the presentational systems. The goals and tasks of these centers can be described according to institutional functions well known from our traditional information ecosystem: library, archive, museum and workshop.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 89-93
# 5
Roesler-Schmidt, Gregor • Matuschka, Beatrice
Abstract: Piql Preservation Services (‘Piql’) emerged out of an industrial consortium which was set up in 2009 with the aim of developing a reliable, secure, cost-effective long-term archive solution for digital data. Until now the archiving of data on a supporting medium was often times problematic as the stability and reproducibility of data was not guaranteed. Using photosensitive polyester-based micrographic film, a very stable material that remains unchanged for a period of centuries in optimal conservation conditions, Piql generated a future-proof archiving system.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 83-87
# 6
Redöhl, Brit
Abstract: The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) is the largest organisation providing third-party research funding in Germany. As such, the DFG is well aware of the ncreasing importance of Research Data Management in all fields of research. Accordingly, the DFG supports the establishment of suitable community-specific guidelines or minimum standards for the handling of research data and the identification of potential for re-use. At institutional level this led to the enactment of DFG Guidelines on the handling of research data in autumn 2015. At the level of funding programmes there is first and foremost the open funding programme 'Information Infrastructures for Research Data'. Furthermore, DFG is raising awareness of projects focussing on information infrastructure (INF) embedded in Collaborative Research Centres (SFB). Here, new procedures and a highlighted emphasis during the peer review process are being introduced.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 77-81
# 7
Recker, Jonas • Katsanidou, Alexia
Abstract: The requirements of research data management (RDM) and data sharing can seem quite overwhelming for researchers and principle investigators, particularly if they come up relatively late in a project. However, as this article hopes to demonstrate, if considered early on in the research and addressed consistently throughout, data anagement is a manageable effort. In fact, many researchers will find that what nowadays we call ‘research data management’ – understood as the entirety of practices and procedures employed to protect, validate, and describe data with the ultimate objective of keeping them accessible and understandable – actually has a considerable overlap with the standard, day-to-day research practices they have been employing all along. And while planning and implementing research data management certainly involves a somewhat greater effort initially, this investment will pay off later in the project in the form of higher-quality data and efficient use of available resources. Exploring the what, why, when, and how of data management, this article seeks to de-mystify RDM procedures and encourages researchers to reach out to existing support services for help.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 69-76
# 8
Politze, Marius • Decker, Bernd
Abstract: ProjektRepository, initially funded by the German Research Foundation, is a web based pandisciplinary repository for research projects that shall become a central component of scientific cooperation in scientific projects at the university. It is developed by IT Center of RWTH Aachen University on basis of Microsoft SharePoint as a widespread standard product for web based communication and collaboration. The product in turn is extended by several features concerning the tagging and formal retrieval of data. These features make use of ontologies to define the structure of the repository.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 63-68
# 9
Märker, Michael • Willmes, Christian • Hochschild, Volker • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: In the recent past database (DB) systems providing information on early humans and their environment are becoming more and more important and increase rapidly in number. However, this increase in different DB systems is concomitant with an increasing redundancy in the digital information stored in these database systems. Therefore, in this study we explore ways to reduce redundancies due to multiple storage of data and, hence, we show solutions to minimize the requirements to store and manage digital information in the prehistory and paleoenvironment domains. The example is based on the database systems of the DFG financed SFB 806: ‘Our Way to Europe’ and the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities project entitled: ‘The Role Of Culture in Early Expansion of Humans’ (ROCEEH). We focus especially on the spatial data available in both systems as well as on the environmental information. Therefore, we examine and test exchange interfaces based on Spatial Data Infrastructure technology (OGC Standards) and metadata/schema mappings. The paper presents currently implemented interfaces of both database systems in terms of their main commonalities and differences. Based on this overview, we discuss ways of direct links between the DB systems. Moreover, we identify procedures that need to be developed in the future to integrate and exchange data between both systems. We show that DB-linking activities based on the OGC standards yield valuable results and lead to a more efficient, sustainable management of these DB systems providing added values for the related research groups.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 55-61
# 10
Lindlar, Michelle
Abstract: In present day, non-textual material heavily supports commercial, industrial and research needs alike. While the AEC (architecture, engineering, construction) domain was for centuries dominated by analogue drafts, plans and documentations, the planning-to-construction process of today is a predominantly digital one, in which various involved players produce a wide variety of different digital representation forms. Digital curation and preservation methods for architectural 3D data need to be aligned with the practises and expectations of these stakeholders. This paper introduces the approach the DURAARK (DURable ARchitectural Knowledge) project has taken in developing methods and tools to support digital curation and preservation of 3D architectural knowledge.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 47-53
spinning wheel Loading next page