157 documents found in 399ms
# 1
Beekman, Fred • Willingshofer, Ernst • Sokoutis, Dimitrios • Pueyo, Emilio Luis • Casas, Antonio M. • (et. al.)
Abstract: This dataset provides friction data from ring-shear tests (RST) on an iron powder – quartz sand mixture (weight ratio 1:3). This material is used in particular as marker material in analogue experiments that are monitored with CT-scanners in the Tectonic Laboratory (TecLab) at Utrecht University (NL) (Pueyo et al., 2017; 2018). The material has been characterized by means of internal friction coefficients µ and cohesions C as a remote service by the Helmholtz Laboratory for Tectonic Modelling (HelTec) at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam in the framework of the EPOS (European Plate Observing System) Transnational Access (TNA) call of the Thematic Core Service (TCS) Multi-scale Laboratories (MSL) in 2017. According to our analysis the material behaves as a Mohr-Coulomb material characterized by a linear failure envelope. Peak, dynamic and reactivation friction coefficients are µP = 0.65, µD = 0.53, and µR = 0.62, respectively. Cohesions C are in the range of 70 to 100 Pa. A minor rate-weakening of ~3% per ten-fold change in shear velocity v is evident.
# 2
Bär, Kristian • Reinsch, Thomas • Bott, Judith
Abstract: Petrophysical properties are key to populate numerical models of subsurface process simulations and for the interpretation of many geophysical exploration methods. They are characteristic for specific rock types and may vary considerably as a response to subsurface conditions (e.g. temperature and pressure). Hence, the quality of process simulations and geophysical data interpretation critically depend on the knowledge of in-situ physical properties that have been measured for a specific rock unit. Inquiries for rock property values for a specific site might become a very time-consuming challenge given that such data are (1) spread across diverse publications and compilations, (2) heterogeneous in quality and (3) continuously being acquired in different laboratories worldwide. One important quality factor for the usability of measured petrophysical properties is the availability of corresponding metadata such as the sample location, petrography, stratigraphy, or the measuring method, conditions and authorship. The open-access database presented here aims at providing easily accessible, peer-reviewed information on physical rock properties in one single compilation. As it has been developed within the scope of the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553), the database mainly contains information relevant for geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization, namely hydraulic, thermophysical and mechanical properties and, in addition, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. The uniqueness of this database emerges from its coverage and metadata structure. Each measured value is complemented by the corresponding sample location, petrographic description, chronostratigraphic age and original citation. The original stratigraphic and petrographic descriptions are transferred to standardized catalogues following a hierarchical structure ensuring intercomparability for statistical analysis. In addition, information on the experimental set-up (methods) and the measurement conditions are given for quality control. Thus, rock properties can directly be related to in-situ conditions to derive specific parameters relevant for modelling the subsurface or interpreting geophysical data.
# 3
Billing, Maik • Thonicke, Kirsten • von Bloh, Werner • Sakschewski, Boris
Abstract: LPJmL-FIT is process- and trait-based vegetation model. It is a subversion of the model LPJmL simulating patches of competing individual trees with flexible functional traits and empirically derived relations between these traits. Trait composition, productivity and stability of a forest are a result of environmental and competitive filtering. A detailed description of LPJmL-FIT (basic features and differences to LPJmL) is given by Sakschewski et al. (Sakschewski et al., 2015, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12870). LPJmL-FIT was originally developed for tropical forests and has been adapted to European forests by Thonicke et al. (2020). The data covers southern and central Europe (29.5°N – 62°N, 11°W – 36°O) on a spatial resolution of 0.5° covering the years 1901-2013. Tree height, leaf and stem traits (specific leaf area, wood density, leaf longevity; aggregated), individual traits of simulated trees, vegetation distribution (foliage projected cover, FPC), vegetation carbon and fire carbon emissions are given on an annual basis. Gross primary productivity is provided monthly. Tree height and leaf and stem traits are biomass weighted. For evaluation of the dataset R- and MATLAB-scripts are provided.An overview and description of all variables are found in the file description.
# 4
van Schaik, Nicolette Loes M.B. • Zangerlé, Anne • Hohenbrink, Tobias L. • Reck, Arne • Schneider, Anne-Kathrin • (et. al.)
Abstract: This dataset consists of spatially and temporally resolved data of dye-infiltration patterns, earthworms and macropores as well as supporting data, such as land use, soil moisture content, soil temperature, bulk density, and soil texture, in the Wollefsbach area of the Attert Catchment in Luxembourg (Pfister et al., 2005). The data was gathered in six measurement campaigns in the period from May 2015 to March 2016. During each measurement campaign we measured at five random sites on each of six chosen fields: three grasslands and three agricultural fields. At each measurement site a combination of measurements was performed: infiltration patterns of blue stained water, earthworm abundance (species level), macropore counts on horizontal soil profiles (in three depths, discriminating three size classes and stained or non-stained), soil temperature and moisture contents in three depths. Finally, undisturbed soil core samples were taken during one campaign for the determination of the texture and bulk density at different sampling sites. In the data table we also include GIS derived values of elevation, slope, aspect, heat load index, and topographical wetness index. Details on all the measurement methods, GIS-analysis methods and units of the data are given below. This data was gathered as part of the Joint Research Project “Catchments as Organised Systems” (CAOS, Zehe et al., 2014) funded by the German Research Foundation. ---------------------------------------------------Version history: 10 February 2020, release of Version 1.1.: The authors discovered that some rows in the data table “Earthworms_Macropores_Data.csv” for September Field 3 and Field 4 were accidentally exchanged. Compared to version 1.0, the data in rows 71 to 75 (Sept_3_1 to Sept_3_5) were exchanged with the data in rows 76 to 80 (Sept_4_1 to Sept_4_5). The authors apologise for this and ask everyone who downloaded the data of version 1.0 are advised to only use version 1.1, because there was an error which could lead to wrong results. Nevertheless, version 1.0 of the data table is available in the "previous-versions" subfolder via the Data Download link. The infiltration data included in “2019-022_vanSchaik-et-al_Infiltration_patterns.zip” remain unchanged.
# 5
Cooke, Michele • Toenenboehn, Kevin • Hatch, Jennifer
Abstract: Experiments of oblique convergence at angles of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees from the margin within wet kaolin. One suite of experiments, denoted as ‘precut’, has a vertical surface precut within the clay with an electrified wire. The precut surface lies directly above the basal oblique dislocation. The other suite of experiments is ‘uncut’. Regardless of whether the experiments have a precut surface, slip partitioned fault systems, develop and persist in the experiments. Such systems have two simultaneously active faults with similar strike but different slip sense. Slip partitioning also develops regardless of whether the system first grows a reverse fault or strike slip fault in the experiment. The sequence and nature of strike-slip and reverse fault development depends on present of existing cut and convergence angle. This data set includes time series of incremental displacement maps for eleven experiments performed at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in January 2017 and March 2018 as well as animations of strain and uplift. The dataset includes the 30˚ convergence experiment with precut vertical surface but the 30˚ uncut experiment has not yet been performed. The time series data are organized into 11 netCDF files. The name of each file states the obliquity of convergence and whether the vertical surface was precut or not. Each netCDF file contains the following • ux = the incremental displacement field within the ROI (Region Of Interest) parallel to the margin (x-direction). The third dimension in the array corresponds to increment of deformation through the experiment. Units are mm.• uy = the incremental displacement field within the ROI perpendicular to the margin (y-direction). The third dimension in the array corresponds to increment of deformation through the experiment. Units are mm.• x = position parallel to the margin. Units are mm.• y = position perpendicular to the margin. Units are mm. The incremental displacements are calculated from DIC of photographs taken every 30 seconds using PIVlab (Thielicke, 2019). The net stepper motor speed is ~0.5 mm/min. The animations show strain evolution of all eleven experiments and uplift evolution of the 10 degree precut experiment. The strain evolution experiments overlay colormaps of incremental strain between successive photos on photographs of the experiment. Color saturation indicates the strain rate and hue indicates the slip vector. The uplift maps were made from stereovision analysis from pairs of photos. In most experiments, decorrelation of portions of the map prevented us from producing high quality uplift evolution animations from the start to the end of the experiment. Only the 10 degree convergence with precut vertical surface experiment had full coherence of uplift signal throughout the experiment and that animation.
# 6
Yuan, Xiaohui • Schurr, Bernd • Haberland, Christian • Abdybachaev, Ulan • Sharshebaev, Azamat
Abstract: We propose to investigate the structure and evolution of the Main Pamir Thrust (MPT) with a high-density seismological array. The MPT, with its surface expression along the east-west trending Alai Valley, marks the northern boundary of the Pamir. The Alai Valley, separating the Pamir and the Tien Shan, constitutes the last vestige of a formerly continuous basin that linked the Tarim and the Tajik Basins. The MPT manifests itself as a place of high seismic activity with frequently occurred disastrous earthquakes. The array is about 50 km long, consisted of 90 three-component geophones (stations G?? and C??) and 10 Trillium-Compact seismometers (stations T??), and equipped with 100 CUBE dataloggers. We will construct a high-resolution receiver function profile to image the MPT and accurately locate the local earthquakes associated with the MPT. Funded by BMBF, within the framework of CaTeNA project – Climatic and Tectonic Natural Hazards in Central Asia. Waveform data are available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 7A and are embargoed until Jan 2024.
# 7
Matuschek, Hannes • Mauerberger, Stefan
Abstract: This library implements several functions to convert points and fields between several reference coordinate systems (e.g., GEO, SM and MAG) and different representations (carthesian, spherical) within each reference system. The aim of this library is to collect all functions needed to perform coordinate system transformations in a consistent and encapsulated way.
# 8
Bär, Kristian • Mielke, Philipp
Abstract: This data publication is part of the 'P³-Petrophysical Property Database' project, which was developed within the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553) and consists of a scientific paper, a full report on the database, the database as excel and .csv files and additional tables for a hierarchical classification of the petrography and stratigraphy of the investigated rock samples (see related references). This publication here provides a hierarchical interlinked stratigraphic classification according to the chronostratigraphical units of the international chronostratigraphic chart of the IUGS v2016/04 (Cohen et al. 2013, updated) according to international standardisation. As addition to this IUGS chart, which is also documented in GeoSciML, stratigraphic IDs and parent IDs were included to define the direct relationships between the stratigraphic terms. The P³ database aims at providing easily accessible, peer-reviewed information on physical rock properties relevant for geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization in one single compilation. Collected data include hydraulic, thermophysical and mechanical properties and, in addition, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. Each measured value is complemented by relevant meta-information such as the corresponding sample location, petrographic description, chronostratigraphic age and, most important, original citation. The original stratigraphic and petrographic descriptions are transferred to standardized catalogues following a hierarchical structure ensuring intercomparability for statistical analysis, of which the stratigraphic catalogue is presented here. These chronostratigraphic units are compiled to ensure that formations of a certain age are connected to the corresponding stratigraphic epoch, period or erathem. Thus, the chronostratigraphic units are directly correlated to each other by their stratigraphic ID and stratigraphic parent ID and can thus be used for interlinked data assessment of the petrophysical properties of samples of an according stratigraphic unit.
# 9
Bär, Kristian • Mielke, Philipp • Knorz, Katharina
Abstract: This data publication is part of the 'P³-Petrophysical Property Database' project, which has been developed within the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553) and consists of a scientific paper, a full report on the database, the database as excel and .csv files and additional tables for a hierarchical classification of the petrography and stratigraphy of the investigated rock samples (see related references). This publication here provides a hierarchical interlinked petrographic classification according to standardized and internationally defined petrographic terms. The petrography or rock type classification scheme is structured based on a hierarchical subdivision with nine different ranks, where the rock description generally becomes more detailed with increasing rank of petrographic classification (based on the well database of the Geological Survey of Hessen, Germany: Hessisches Landesamt für Umwelt, Naturschutz, Umwelt und Geologie (HLNUG)). This hierarchical subdivision and the definitions of the petrographic terms are based on international conventions (e.g. Bates & Jackson 1987, Gillespie & Styles 1999, Robertson 1999, Hallsworth & Knox 1999, Bas & Streckeisen 1991, Schmid 1981, Fisher & Smith 1991). Furthermore, the classification corresponds to the subdivision provided by existing property data compilations such as e.g. Hantschel and Kauerauf (2009), Schön (2011), Rybach (1984) and Clauser and Huenges (1995). Petrographic classifications from rank 1 to rank 4 can usually be identified from macroscopic descriptions of well logs, cores and geological mapping. The petrographic classifications from rank 5 to rank 9 require additional information on the texture or grain size, the modal composition or the geochemistry etc., which can usually only be acquired by microscopic or comparable special investigations. Overall, the nine ranks cover a total of 1494 petrographic terms and thus goes well beyond other standardized catalogues (e.g. 'Simplified Lithology' in GeoSciML). The petrographic classification of a sample in P³ is based on the sample description within the original literature reference. A petrographic ID and a corresponding petrographic parental ID directly correlate the different classifications and their ranks.
# 10
Dietze, Michael • Cook, Kristen L. • Hovius, Niels
Abstract: Cliffs line many erosional coastlines. Localized failures can cause land loss and hazard, and impact ecosystems and sediment routing. Links between cliff erosion and forcing mechanisms are poorly constrained, due to limitations of classic approaches. Combining multi-seasonal seismic and drone surveys, wave, precipitation and groundwater data we study drivers and triggers of seismically detected failures along the chalk cliffs on Germany's largest island, Rügen. The network consists of four (later five) seismic stations along the 8.6 km long chalk cliff coast. Waveform data are available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 4K, and are embargoed until Jan 2021.
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