75 documents found in 236ms
# 1
Asch, G. • Mohsen, A. • Bräuer, B. • Hofstetter, R. • Jaser, D. • (et. al.)
Abstract: For the seismology part of DESIRE 38 short period stations and 27 broadband stations were deployed in the area of the southern Dead Sea basin in Israel and Jordan. The deployment was covering the basin as well as the shoulders of the basin. The average spacing was 2.5 km in Jordan and 4.5 km in Israel. Due to problems with vandalism and thefts in some locations in Israel so we lost some stations and had to dismantle all stations in unguarded areas. For the redeployment of these stations in June 2007 the study area was enlarged to the North and to the South. This network configuration made it appropriate to observe the local microearthquake activities as well as teleseismic events. The (micro)seismicity, its distribution and its properties were an important subject of the investigation. Furthermore the seismic events can be used to study the deeper structure of the DSB, which can be supported by investigations using teleseismic events. Waveform data is available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code Z4, and is fully open.
# 2
Wilde-Piórko, Monika • Geissler, Wolfram H. • Plomerová, Jaroslava • Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte • Grad, Marek • (et. al.)
Abstract: The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) as part of the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) is one of the most prominent suture zones in Europe separating the young Palaeozoic platform from the much older Precambrian East European craton. The knowledge of deep structure of the TESZ is very important for the understanding of various tectonic processes in Europe. The PASSEQ 2006-2008 seismic experiment was performed thanks to a big international effort of 17 institutions from 10 countries. A total of 139 three-component temporary short-period and 49 temporary broadband seismic stations provided continuous recordings between May 2006 and June 2008 with the main period of recordings during 2007, in an array about 1200 km long and 400 km wide running from Germany through the Czech Republic and Poland to Lithuania. The average spacing between all stations was about 60 km, attaining about 20 km in the central part. The configuration of the seismic network was a compromise among needs of different seismic methods. The dense central profile allows the use of modern passive 2-D imaging techniques, while the distribution of broadband sensors was designed for surface wave and receiver function studies of the upper mantle down to the transition zone in a wide frequency range. Waveform data is fully open, with network code 7E.
# 3
GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences • Institut des Sciences de l’Univers-Centre National de la Recherche CNRS-INSU
Abstract: The IPOC seismic network is part of the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC), a European-Chilean network of institutions and scientists organizing and operating a distributed system of instruments and projects dedicated to the study of earthquakes and deformation at the continental margin of Chile. In particular, the seismic network is jointly operated by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany; the Institut de Physique du Globe Paris, France (IPGP); the Chilean National Seismological Centre (CSN); the Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile (UdC); and the Universidad Católica del Norte, Antofagasta, Chile (UCNA). The subduction plate boundary between the South American and the oceanic Nazca plates exhibits some of the largest earthquakes on Earth. The IPOC goal is to improve the understanding of both the physical mechanisms underlying these processes and the natural hazards induced by them. The observatory is designed to monitor the plate boundary system from the Peru-Chile border to south of the city of Antofagasta, from the coast to the high Andes, capturing both great and small earthquakes in this region. A key component of IPOC is its multi-parameter observatories, where at each site a suite of different physical parameters are measured continuously. So far about 20 such multi-parameter stations are installed. All of these sites are equipped with STS-2 broadband seismometers and accelerometers. Additional instrumentation at some of the stations includes continuous GPS, electric and magnetic field (MT), surface inclination, and climate (temperature, air pressure, humidity). Most sites transmit their data in near-real time using a suite of communication channels (VSAT, WiFi, telemetry etc.). Seismic instruments are deployed on concrete pedestals in bedrock caverns (a few meters deep) to measure ground shaking from earthquakes or other sources that last from a tiny fraction of a second to several hours. Strong-motion sensors are deployed next to the broadband sensors to increase the dynamic range and for earthquake engineering applications. Broadband data are freely distributed in real-time and archive data is also available. This DOI encompasses all IPOC seismic data; data is available under FDSN network code CX.
# 4
De Batist, M. • Canals, M. • Sherstyankin, P. • Alekseev, S. • INTAS Project 99-1669 Team
Abstract: In 1999 it was decided to create an international team of specialists and combine efforts and expertise to produce a new, more accurate bathymetric map of Lake Baikal. The aim was to re-compile the original sounding data that were used for the 1992 maps, to digitise them, to correct them using up-to-date, calibrated acoustic velocity information, to integrate them with as much as possible of the more recently acquired sounding data, and to produce a new, computer-generated, computer version of the Lake Baikal bathymetry map based on ALL available sounding data.
# 5
Förster, A. • Hötzl, H. • Rettenmaier, D. • Kück, J.
Abstract: Several geophysical logs were obtained in 2002 in the AIG10 borehole. One set of logs (FMI, UBI, and DSI) were measured by Schlumberger in the deep, open-hole part of the borehole (Daniel et al., 2004; Prioul et. al., 2004). GFZ and ICDP OSG performed two logging campaigns with GFZ standard logging tools (Mud Parameter, SGR, GR-BCS-DIL and MSFL). The first campaign covered the section to a depth of 708 m (depth of casing), the second campaign covers the entire borehole to 1001 m (total depth). In May 2003, a third campaign was conducted by GFZ and IPGP, which included the measurement of a temperature log with GFZ's Distributed Optical Fibre Temperature Sensing (DTS) system.
# 6
Martin, Patrick • Boes, Xavier • Goddeeris, Boudewijn • Fagel, Natalie
Abstract: The vertical distribution of organisms in the sediment indicates that animals can be present as deep as 15 cm although at very low abundance at such depths (Fig. 4, Fig. 5 and Fig. 6). Oligochaetes and nematods are the only groups able to deeply penetrate into the sediment at significant densities (Fig. 4) in contrast to all other groups, which stay closer to the sediment surface. Maximal densities however seem to shift to the sediment surface with increasing bathymetric depth, as suggested in Fig. 5 and Fig. 6, so that all animal groups are more concentrated near the surface in the deepest parts of Lake Baikal. In such case, the depth of sediment mixing due to bioturbation appears to decrease with increasing bathymetric depth (Fig. 2b).
# 7
Martin, Patrick • Boes, Xavier • Goddeeris, Boudewijn • Fagel, Natalie
Abstract: The vertical distribution of organisms in the sediment indicates that animals can be present as deep as 15 cm although at very low abundance at such depths (Fig. 4, Fig. 5 and Fig. 6). Oligochaetes and nematods are the only groups able to deeply penetrate into the sediment at significant densities (Fig. 4) in contrast to all other groups, which stay closer to the sediment surface. Maximal densities however seem to shift to the sediment surface with increasing bathymetric depth, as suggested in Fig. 5 and Fig. 6, so that all animal groups are more concentrated near the surface in the deepest parts of Lake Baikal. In such case, the depth of sediment mixing due to bioturbation appears to decrease with increasing bathymetric depth (Fig. 2b).
# 8
Martin, Patrick • Boes, Xavier • Goddeeris, Boudewijn • Fagel, Natalie
Abstract: The vertical distribution of organisms in the sediment indicates that animals can be present as deep as 15 cm although at very low abundance at such depths (Fig. 4, Fig. 5 and Fig. 6). Oligochaetes and nematods are the only groups able to deeply penetrate into the sediment at significant densities (Fig. 4) in contrast to all other groups, which stay closer to the sediment surface. Maximal densities however seem to shift to the sediment surface with increasing bathymetric depth, as suggested in Fig. 5 and Fig. 6, so that all animal groups are more concentrated near the surface in the deepest parts of Lake Baikal. In such case, the depth of sediment mixing due to bioturbation appears to decrease with increasing bathymetric depth (Fig. 2b).
# 9
Martin, Patrick • Boes, Xavier • Goddeeris, Boudewijn • Fagel, Natalie
Abstract: In all abyssal stations, densities are never over an average of c. 3100 individuals m−2 (Fig. 3, Table 1). In contrast, the shallow station (CON01-427, Posolskoe Bank) harbours the highest observed densities (oligochaetes reach densities as high as 13573 individuals m−2 on average). Gammarids are present in this latter station at 128 m deep, while they are absent from all deep stations. The presence of some groups is anecdotal, such as Hydrachnidia (one specimen in a core at 388 m and two specimens in a core at 625 m) and chironomid larvae (two larvae in a core at 625 m). Interestingly, the two deepest Vydrino cores (CON01-105-7, 600 m, and CON01-106-3, 700 m) are virtually free from animals, suggesting that these stations are perhaps the best choice for the study of stratigraphy and climate proxies.
# 10
Mackay, Anson • Ryves, D. • Battarbee, Rick • Flower, Roger • Jewson, David • (et. al.)
Abstract: Diatom-inferred snow depth reconstructions for BAIK38 using uncorrected taxa (Fig. 5a–c) show similar trends throughout the study period, with all or only five taxa in the model; snow depth levels are marginally higher in zone 2 in comparison to zones 1 and 3. However, error values are large in comparison to the changes observed. The snow depth reconstruction using corrected diatom abundances (Fig. 5d) shows a somewhat different response. Low values characterise the period coincident with the MWP (between c. 880 AD and c. 1180 AD), which increase into the LIA, reaching peak depths between 1500 and 1775 AD. After then, snow depth values decline to their lowest values in this study by c. 1900 AD. In recent decades, snow depth values appear to increase slightly again up to the top of the core dated at 1994.
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