129 documents found in 471ms
# 1
Bär, Kristian • Reinsch, Thomas • Bott, Judith
Abstract: Petrophysical properties are key to populate numerical models of subsurface process simulations and for the interpretation of many geophysical exploration methods. They are characteristic for specific rock types and may vary considerably as a response to subsurface conditions (e.g. temperature and pressure). Hence, the quality of process simulations and geophysical data interpretation critically depend on the knowledge of in-situ physical properties that have been measured for a specific rock unit. Inquiries for rock property values for a specific site might become a very time-consuming challenge given that such data are (1) spread across diverse publications and compilations, (2) heterogeneous in quality and (3) continuously being acquired in different laboratories worldwide. One important quality factor for the usability of measured petrophysical properties is the availability of corresponding metadata such as the sample location, petrography, stratigraphy, or the measuring method, conditions and authorship. The open-access database presented here aims at providing easily accessible, peer-reviewed information on physical rock properties in one single compilation. As it has been developed within the scope of the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553), the database mainly contains information relevant for geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization, namely hydraulic, thermophysical and mechanical properties and, in addition, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. The uniqueness of this database emerges from its coverage and metadata structure. Each measured value is complemented by the corresponding sample location, petrographic description, chronostratigraphic age and original citation. The original stratigraphic and petrographic descriptions are transferred to standardized catalogues following a hierarchical structure ensuring intercomparability for statistical analysis. In addition, information on the experimental set-up (methods) and the measurement conditions are given for quality control. Thus, rock properties can directly be related to in-situ conditions to derive specific parameters relevant for modelling the subsurface or interpreting geophysical data.
# 2
Heidbach, Oliver • Rajabi, Mojtaba • Reiter, Karsten • Ziegler, Moritz • WSM Team
Abstract: The World Stress Map (WSM) database is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale. The WSM database release 2016 contains 42,870 data records within the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust. The data are provided in three formats: Excel-file (wsm2016.xlsx), comma separated fields (wsm2016.csv) and with a zipped google Earth input file (wsm2016_google.zip). Data records with reliable A-C quality are displayed in the World Stress Map (doi:10.5880/WSM.2016.002). Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at www.world-stress-map.org. VERSION HISTORY:Version 1.1. (15 June 2019): updated version of the zip-compressed Google Earth .kml (wsm2016_google.zip) with a new URL of the server.
# 3
Bär, Kristian • Mielke, Philipp
Abstract: This data publication is part of the 'P³-Petrophysical Property Database' project, which was developed within the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553) and consists of a scientific paper, a full report on the database, the database as excel and .csv files and additional tables for a hierarchical classification of the petrography and stratigraphy of the investigated rock samples (see related references). This publication here provides a hierarchical interlinked stratigraphic classification according to the chronostratigraphical units of the international chronostratigraphic chart of the IUGS v2016/04 (Cohen et al. 2013, updated) according to international standardisation. As addition to this IUGS chart, which is also documented in GeoSciML, stratigraphic IDs and parent IDs were included to define the direct relationships between the stratigraphic terms. The P³ database aims at providing easily accessible, peer-reviewed information on physical rock properties relevant for geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization in one single compilation. Collected data include hydraulic, thermophysical and mechanical properties and, in addition, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. Each measured value is complemented by relevant meta-information such as the corresponding sample location, petrographic description, chronostratigraphic age and, most important, original citation. The original stratigraphic and petrographic descriptions are transferred to standardized catalogues following a hierarchical structure ensuring intercomparability for statistical analysis, of which the stratigraphic catalogue is presented here. These chronostratigraphic units are compiled to ensure that formations of a certain age are connected to the corresponding stratigraphic epoch, period or erathem. Thus, the chronostratigraphic units are directly correlated to each other by their stratigraphic ID and stratigraphic parent ID and can thus be used for interlinked data assessment of the petrophysical properties of samples of an according stratigraphic unit.
# 4
Bär, Kristian • Mielke, Philipp • Knorz, Katharina
Abstract: This data publication is part of the 'P³-Petrophysical Property Database' project, which has been developed within the EC funded project IMAGE (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, EU grant agreement No. 608553) and consists of a scientific paper, a full report on the database, the database as excel and .csv files and additional tables for a hierarchical classification of the petrography and stratigraphy of the investigated rock samples (see related references). This publication here provides a hierarchical interlinked petrographic classification according to standardized and internationally defined petrographic terms. The petrography or rock type classification scheme is structured based on a hierarchical subdivision with nine different ranks, where the rock description generally becomes more detailed with increasing rank of petrographic classification (based on the well database of the Geological Survey of Hessen, Germany: Hessisches Landesamt für Umwelt, Naturschutz, Umwelt und Geologie (HLNUG)). This hierarchical subdivision and the definitions of the petrographic terms are based on international conventions (e.g. Bates & Jackson 1987, Gillespie & Styles 1999, Robertson 1999, Hallsworth & Knox 1999, Bas & Streckeisen 1991, Schmid 1981, Fisher & Smith 1991). Furthermore, the classification corresponds to the subdivision provided by existing property data compilations such as e.g. Hantschel and Kauerauf (2009), Schön (2011), Rybach (1984) and Clauser and Huenges (1995). Petrographic classifications from rank 1 to rank 4 can usually be identified from macroscopic descriptions of well logs, cores and geological mapping. The petrographic classifications from rank 5 to rank 9 require additional information on the texture or grain size, the modal composition or the geochemistry etc., which can usually only be acquired by microscopic or comparable special investigations. Overall, the nine ranks cover a total of 1494 petrographic terms and thus goes well beyond other standardized catalogues (e.g. 'Simplified Lithology' in GeoSciML). The petrographic classification of a sample in P³ is based on the sample description within the original literature reference. A petrographic ID and a corresponding petrographic parental ID directly correlate the different classifications and their ranks.
# 5
Rudolf, Michael • Rosenau, Matthias • Ziegenhagen, Thomas • Ludwikowski, Volker • Schucht, Torsten • (et. al.)
Abstract: The presented datasets and scripts have been obtained for testing the performance of a trigger algorithm for use in combination with a ringshear tester ‘RST-01.pc’. Glass beads (fused quartz microbeads, 300-400 µm diameter) and thai rice are sheared at varying velocity, stiffness and normal load. The data is provided as preprocessed mat-files ('*.mat') to be opened with Matlab R2015a and later. Several scripts are provided to reproduce the figures found in (Rudolf et al., submitted). A detailed list of files together with the respective software needed to view and execute them is available in 'List_of_Files_Rudolf-et-al-2018.pdf' (also available in MS Excel Format). More information on the datasets and a small documentation of the scripts is given in 'Explanations_Rudolf-et-al-2018.pdf'. The complete data publication, including all descriptions, datasets, and evaluation scripts is available as 'Dataset_Rudolf-et-al-2018.zip'.
# 6
Radosavljevic, Boris • Quinteros, Javier • Bertelmann, Roland • Hemmleb, Susanne • Elger, Kirsten • (et. al.)
Abstract: This publication contains tabular summaries of the data management survey carried out at the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, as well as the diagrams of individual questions shown in Radosavljevic et al. (2019). The online survey was conducted from August 27 to September 27, 2019. The survey design leaned on similar surveys carried out at German universities and research institutions (e.g. Paul-Stüve et al., 2015; Simukovic et al., 2013) The survey queried aspects of the complete data life cycle - from the planning stage to reuse in 37 questions: 16 single response (SR); where only one answer was possible, and 20 multiple response (MR) where multiple answers could be selected, and one free text question. Research staff at all career levels was the target audience for the survey. Invitations to participate in the completely anonymous online survey were sent out over the general GFZ lists. The survey was carried out with the Questback EFS Survey platform. 226 attempts, out of 411, led to completed questionnaires corresponding to a 55% completion rate. Compared to the target audience at GFZ, the participation rate amounted to ca. 24%. However, less than 20% of employees classified as infrastructure support employees or bachelor’s and master’s students and student assistants completed the survey. Replies falling into these categories were grouped into “others” in the report as well as in the data presented here. Data summaries are given in two tab-separated tables corresponding to response counts or percentage for each question. These are grouped by department, role and employment length. Questions 5 and 34 were ranking questions and the corresponding responses in the percentages table represent arithmetic means of the replies for these questions – not percentages. The response counts for these question are presented in the “Counts” table. Free text replies are omitted from these results. In addition, the diagrams of individual questions are presented Radosavljevic et al. (2019) are also provided in png and pdf formats.
# 7
Heidbach, Oliver • Tingay, Mark • Barth, Andreas • Reinecker, John • Kurfess, Daniel • (et. al.)
Abstract: The World Stress Map (WSM) is the global repository for contemporary tectonic stress data from the Earth's crust. Its uniformity and quality is guaranteed through quality ranking of the data according to international standards and a standardized regime assignment. The WSM merges data which otherwise would be fragmented in separate, often inaccessible archives. It provides the long-term preservation of tectonic stress data from physical loss of data carriers or organizational problems of data storage. The data are provided as Excel table (xlsx) and tab-delimited text.
# 8
Heidbach, Oliver • Rajabi, Mojtaba • Reiter, Karsten • Ziegler, Moritz
Abstract: The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System.All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale. The stress map displays A-C quality stress data records of the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust from the WSM database release 2016 (doi:10.5880/WSM.2016.001). Focal mechanism solutions determined as being potentially unreliable (labelled as Possible Plate Boundary Events in the database) are not displayed. Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at http://www.world-stress-map.org.
# 9
Heidbach, Oliver • Custodio, Susana • Kingdon, Andrew • Mariucci, Maria Theresa • Montone, Paola • (et. al.)
Abstract: The Stress Map of the Mediterranean and Central Europe 2016 displays 5011 A-C quality stress data records of the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust from the WSM database release 2016 (Heidbach et al, 2016, http://doi.org/10.5880/WSM.2016.001). Focal mechanism solutions determined as being potentially unreliable (labelled as Possible Plate Boundary Events in the database) are not displayed. Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at www.world-stress-map.org.
The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale.
# 10
Ullah, Shahid • Abdrakhmatov, Kanat • Sadykova, Alla • Ibragimov, Roman • Ishuk, Anatoly • (et. al.)
Abstract: Version History11 Sep 2019: Release of Version 1.1 with the following changes: (1) new licence: CC BY SA 4.0, modification of the title: removal of file name and version); (2) addition of ORIDs when available; (3) actualisation of affiliations for some authors The metadata of the first version 1.0 is available in the download folder.. Data and file names remain unchanged. Area Source model for Central AsiaThe area sources for Central Asia within the EMCA model are defined by mainly considering the pattern of crustal seismicity down to 50 km depth. Although tectonic and geological information, such as the position and strike distribution of known faults, have also been taken into account when available. Large area sources (see, for example source_id 1, 2, 5, 45 and 52, source ids are identified by parameter “source_id” in the related shapefile) are defined where the seismicity is scarce and there are no tectonic or geological features that would justify a further subdivision. Smaller area sources (e.g., source_id values 36 and 53) have been designed where the seismicity can be assigned to known fault zones.In order to obtain a robust estimation of the necessary parameters for PSHA derived by the statistical analysis of the seismicity, due to the scarcity of data in some of the areas covered by the model, super zones are introduced. These super zones are defined by combining area sources based on similarities in their tectonic regime, and taking into account local expert’s judgments. The super zones are used to estimate: (1) the completeness time of the earthquake catalogue, (2) the depth distribution of seismicity, (3) the tectonic regime through focal mechanisms analysis, (4) the maximum magnitude and (5) the b values via the GR relationship.The earthquake catalogue for focal mechanism is extracted from the Harvard Global Centroid Moment Tensor Catalog (Ekström and Nettles, 2013). For the focal mechanism classification, the Boore et al. (1997) convention is used. This means that an event is considered to be strike-slip if the absolute value of the rake angle is <=30 or >=150 degrees, normal if the rake angle is <-30 or >-150 and reverse (thrust) if the rake angle is >30 or <150 degrees. The distribution of source mechanisms and their weights are estimated for the super zones.For area sources, the maximum magnitude is usually taken from the historical seismicity, but due to some uncertainties in the magnitudes of the largest events, the opinions of the local experts are also included in assigning the maximum magnitude to each super zone. Super zones 2 and 3, which belongs to stable regions, are each assigned a maximum magnitude of 6, after Mooney et al. (2012), which concludes after analyses and observation of modern datasets that at least an event of magnitude 6 can occur anywhere in the world. For hazard calculations, each area source is assigned the maximum magnitude of their respective super zone.For processing the GR parameters (a and b values) for the area sources, the completeness analysis results estimated for the super zones are assigned to the respective smaller area sources. If the individual area source has at least 20 events, the GR parameters are then estimated for the area source. Otherwise, the b value is adopted from the respective super zone to which the smaller area source belongs, and the a value is estimated based on the Weichert (1980) method. This ensures the stability in the b value as well as the variation of activity rate for different sources.The hypocentral depth distribution is estimated from the seismicity inside each super zone. The depth distribution is considered for maximum up to three values. Based on the number of events, the weights are assigned to each distribution. These depth distributions, along with corresponding weights, are further assigned to the area sources within the same super zones.
Distribution file: "EMCA_seismozonesv1.0_shp.zip"Version: v1.0Release date: 2015-07-30Format: ESRI ShapefileGeometry type: polygonsNumber of features: 63Spatial Reference System: +proj=longlat +ellps=WGS84 +datum=WGS84 +no_defs Distribution file: "EMCA_seismozonesv1.0_nrml.zip"Version: v1.0Release date: 2015-07-30Format: NRML (XML) Format compatible with the GEM OpenQuake platform (http://www.globalquakemodel.org/openquake/about/platform/) Feature attributes:src_id : Id of the seismic sourcesrc_name : Name of the seismic sourcetect_reg: Tectonic regime of the seismic sourceupp_seismo : Upper level of the the seismogenic depth (km)low_seismo : Lower level of the seismogenic depth (km)mag_scal_r: Magnitude scaling relationshiprup_asp_ra: Rupture aspect ratiomfd_type : Magnitude frequency distribution typemin_mag: Minimum magnitude of the magnitude frequency relationshipmax_mag: Maximum magnitude of the magnitude frequency relationshipa_value: a value of the magnitude frequency relationshipb_balue : b value of the magnitude frequency relationshipnum_npd: number of nodal plane distributionweight_1 : weight of 1st nodal plane distributionstrike_1: Strike of the seismic source (degrees)rake_1: rake of the seismic source (degrees)dip_1: dip of the seismic source (degrees)num_hdd: number of hypocentral depth distributionhdd_d_1: Depth of 1st hypocentral depth distribution (km)hdd_w_1: Weight of 1st hypocentral depth distribution
spinning wheel Loading next page