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# 1
Gerten, Dieter (Ed.) • Heck, Vera • Jägermeyr, Jonas • Bodirsky, Benjamin • Fetzer, Ingo • (et. al.)
Abstract: The netCDF data stored here represent crop production simulations from the LPJmL biosphere model underlying the different steps of the U-turn portrayed in the main paper by Gerten et al. The LPJmL data cover the entire globe with a spatial resolution of 0.5° for the baseline period as well as for different scenarios reflecting the studied ways to restrict crop production through maintaining planetary boundaries on the one hand and the various opportunities to increase food supply within the boundaries on the other hand (see paper, specifically Figs. 1 & 2, Table 2). The stored variable is crop production (fresh matter) multiplied by the fractional coverage of different crop functional types, per 0.5° grid cell. The data are provided in one netCDF file for each scenario. An overview of the scenarios assigned to the folder names is given in the file inventory. The data support the study: Gerten, D., Heck, V., Jägermeyr, J., Bodirsky, B.L., Fetzer, I., Jalava, M., Kummu, M., Lucht, W., Rockström, J., Schaphoff, S., Schellnhuber, H.J.: Feeding ten billion people is possible within four terrestrial planetary boundaries. Nature Sustainability (2020).
# 2
Lüdtke, Stefan • Steinhausen, Max • Schröter, Kai • Figueiredo, Rui • Kreibich, Heidi
Abstract: Increasing flood losses over the last decades emphasize the need towards significantly improved and more efficient flood risk management. One key requirement is reliable risk assessment in conjunction with consistent flood loss modeling. Current risk assessments and flood loss estimations for Europe are until now based on regional approaches using deterministic depth-damage function and do rarely report associated uncertainties. To reduce these shortcomings, we present the results of a novel, consistent approach based on the Bayesian Network Flood Loss Estimation MOdel for the private sector (BN-FLEMOps). The dataset is consistent in terms of the input data used to drive the model and because we use the same vulnerability model to derive the flood loss estimation. Essential inputs for any flood loss estimation are hazard (usually water depth), asset (value of objects at risk) and flood experience parameters. The hazard input was given by a European inundation scenario for a continent-wide flood with 100 years return period (Alfieri et al., 2014). Asset values were computed following the the approach by Huizinga et al. (2017) and the flood experience was derived using the database of the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) (Brakenridge, 2018). The provided dataset comprises a flood loss estimation covering the European continent, spatially aggregated on level three of the standard territorial units for statistics NUTS-3 (https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/nuts/background). The data set reports the summary statistics as a flood loss distribution per NUTS-3 region in 10 per cent quantile steps. The flood loss estimations are given in Million Euro. In addition, the NUTS-3 code, the underlying version of the standard territorial unit and the associated NUTS level are provided. This data publication includes the exact dataset as reported in Lüdtke et al (2019) [filename_1], which is single model application. Supplementary, we provide the summary statistics from an ensemble of 1000 model runs to account for the inherent variability of the probabilistic model [filename_2]. The ensemble model application reports the same statistical measures as the single model application (flood loss distribution per NUTS-3 region in 10 per cent quantile steps), but the given numbers show the median of 1000 model runs for each quantile step (10%, 20%, … 90%). The dateset is provided as a multi-polygon vector. All polygons that belong to the same standard territorial unit share the same attributes. The spatial reference system is defined by EPSG:4326. We provide two formats, (I) an ESRI shape file and (ii) a GEOjson representation. For more information please refer to the associated data description.
# 3
Ryberg, Trond • Cable, William • Overduin, Paul • Haberland, Christian
Abstract: During the 2018 “Mackenzie Delta Permafrost Field Campaign” (mCan2018), a test campaign within the “Modular Observation solutions for Earth Systems” (MOSES) program, ambient seismic noise recordings at the sea bottom were acquired along two 300 m long transects from the shoreline to shallow marine area close to Tuktoyaktuk Island (Canada). In total, 21 measurements were taken. Raw data is provided in proprietary “Cube” format and standard mseed format.
The Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam (GIPP) provides field instruments for (temporary) seismological studies (both controlled source and earthquake seismology) and for magnetotelluric (electromagnetic) experiments. The GIPP is operated by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The instrument facility is open for academic use. Instrument applications are evaluated and ranked by an external steering board. See Haberland and Ritter (2016) and https://www.gfz-potsdam.de/gipp for more information.
# 4
Toledo, Tania • Gaucher, Emmanuel • Metz, Malte • Calò, Marco • Figueroa, Angel • (et. al.)
Abstract: Extensive passive seismic monitoring was carried out between September 2017 and September 2018 over the Los Humeros geothermal field in Mexico. This experiment, in addition to several geophysical, geological, and geochemical surveys was conducted in the framework of the European H2020 and Mexican CONACyT-SENER project GEMex for a better understanding of the structures and behavior of the local geothermal system currently under exploitation, and for investigating future development areas. 25 broadband stations (22 Trillium C-120s and 3 Trillium C-20 PH) recording at 200 Hz, and 20 short period stations (Mark L-4C-3D) recording at 100 Hz comprised the network which is sub-divided into two sub-networks. An inner and denser (~1.6-2 km inter-station distance) pseudo-rhomboidal array (27 stations) was laid out to cover the producing zone and retrieve local seismicity mainly associated to injection and production operations, and to comply with beamforming of ambient noise and time reverse imaging techniques. An outer and sparser (~5 km minimum spacing) array was placed at around 30 km radius surrounding the inner network, and was mainly dedicated to larger scale imaging techniques, such as seismic ambient noise tomography, and regional earthquakes tomography. The GEMex project is supported by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme for Research and Innovation under grant agreement No 727550 and the Mexican Energy Sustainability Fund CONACYT-SENER, project 2015-04-68074. Waveform data are available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 6G and are embargoed until Jan 2023.
# 5
Burtin, Arnaud • Cook, Kristen • Chao, Wei-An • Chang, Jui-Ming • Odin, Marc • (et. al.)
Abstract: A line of 6 broadband seismometers have been deployed across a ridge in the Hualien County (Eastern Taiwan). From March 2015 to June 2016 the network has been continuously recording waves incoming from the Taiwanese regional seismicity. During that period, more than 2000 earthquakes with magnitudes Ml>3 and distant from less than 200km were recorded. The hill is well approximated by a triangular topography of 3600m in length by 900m in height. Waveform data are open and available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 5K.
# 6
Lange, Dietrich • Soler, Vicente
Abstract: The unrest of el Hierro Islands started in 2011 with a submarine volcanic eruption. In order to better characterize unrest of El Hierro Island 9 landstations were installed on the Island of ElHierro (Figure 1) between March 2015 and June 2016. Waveform data are available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 2L and are embargoed until Jan 2021.
# 7
Schaphoff (Ed.), Sibyll • von Bloh, Werner • Thonicke, Kirsten • Biemans, Hester • Forkel, Matthias • (et. al.)
Abstract: LPJmL4 is a process-based model that simulates climate and land-use change impacts on the terrestrial biosphere, the water and carbon cycle and on agricultural production. The LPJmL4 model combines plant physiological relations, generalized empirically established functions and plant trait parameters. The model incorporates dynamic land use at the global scale and is also able to simulate the production of woody and herbaceous short-rotation bio-energy plantations. Grid cells may contain one or several types of natural or agricultural vegetation. A comprehensive description of the model is given by Schaphoff et al. (2017a, http://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2017-145). We here present the LPJmL4 model code described and used by the publications in GMD: LPJmL4 - a dynamic global vegetation model with managed land: Part I – Model description and Part II – Model evaluation (Schaphoff et al. 2018a and b, http://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2017-145 and http://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2017-146). The model code of LPJmL4 is programmed in C and can be run in parallel mode using MPI. Makefiles are provided for different platforms. Further informations on how to run LPJmL4 is given in the INSTALL file. Additionally to the publication a html documentation and man pages are provided. Additionally, LPJmL4 can be download from the Gitlab repository: https://gitlab.pik-potsdam.de/lpjml/LPJmL. Further developments of LPJmL will be published through this Gitlab repository regularly.
# 8
Cesca, Simone • Heimann, Sebastian • Letort, Jean • Razafindrakoto, Hoby N. T. • Dahm, Torsten • (et. al.)
Abstract: In May 2018 a volcano-seismic sequence accompanied the upward migration of a magmatic intrusion from Moho depth to the seafloor led to the drainage of the deep magmatic reservoir and to the birth of a submarine volcano offshore the island of Mayotte, Comoro Islands. This process of magma transport was accompanied by an intense seismic swarm and peculiar long-duration very long period signals. Between 1 January 2018 and 1 May 2019 we detected 407 sources of very long period signals and 6990 volcano-tectonic earthquakes. This report collects detection, location and source parameters catalogs for these two sets of earthquake sources. This data publication provides the catalogues of very long period (VLP) signals and volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, as discussed in Cesca et al. (2019). Here, methods and data used to create the different catalogues are only briefly discussed; a more accurate description is given in Cesca et al. (2019), which furthermore discusses the different processes of dike migration, undersea eruption, deep reservoir drainage and overburden sagging which are responsible for the seismic activity.
# 9
Bonnet, Marine • Sardini, Paul • Billon, Sophie • Sitari-Kauppi, Marja • Kuva, Jukka • (et. al.)
Abstract: This data set is part of the manuscript entitled "Determining crack apertures distribution in rocks using 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method: experiments and simulations" by Bonnet, M., Sardini, P., Billon, S., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Kuva, J., Fonteneau, L., & Caner, L. which is currently under review in Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth. All the data set are including in one zip file. It contains:- one text file describing the content of the zip file {ReadMe.txt},- the raw data of the energy profiles obtained by simulations {RawDataEnergyProfiles folder},- one excel file with the data extracted from the energy profiles with Code::Blocks {DataExtractedEnergyProfiles.xlsx},- one image file of two artificial samples (at left with a real aperture of 96 µm and a tilt angle of 90°; at right with a real aperture of 189 µm and a tilt angle of 20°) {ExEch.pdf},- one image file of the scan autoradiograph of perpendicular artificial cracks {AG_Texp8h_1200dpi_Ech90deg.pdf},- and one image file of the scan autoradiograph of tilted artificial cracks {AG_Texp8h_1200dpi_EchTilted.pdf}. The authors provide raw data from the simulations (.txt and .xlsx), as well as some photos of the experimental part (.pdf). Raw data from the simulations are energy profiles (.txt) obtained with Geant4 toolkit. The simulated object is an artificial crack sample in-filled with a radioactive resin (14C-MMA) which is in contact with an autoradiographic film (also simulated), simulating the 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method. Crack aperture and tilt angle (of the crack to the autoradiographic plane) are varying parameters (from [0.1; 1000] µm and from [10; 90]°, respectively). Other raw data from the simulations is one excel file with the data extracted from the energy profiles with the IDE Code::Blocks, for data analysis purposes. Three photos of the experimental part of the article are also made available. One image file of two artificial samples with different crack aperture and tilt angle; one image file of the scan autoradiograph of perpendicular artificial cracks; and one image file of the scan autoradiograph of tilted artificial cracks.
The method employed in the article, from which the data are derived, is the 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method. <br> The heart of the 14C-PMMA method consists of impregnating a sample with liquid 14C-labelled MethylMethAcrylate (14C-MMA), its subsequent polymerisation in the pore space, and autoradiography of the impregnated sample after sowing and polishing, giving a connected porosity map of the studied rock section. The method can also be adapted to determine crack apertures.In the article, we proposed an advanced calibration of the 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method for quantifying real crack apertures by taking into account the variability of tilt angle encountered in natural rock samples. To this aim, a set of artificial crack samples presenting different controlled apertures and tilt angles was used, as well as Monte Carlo simulations through Geant4 toolkit.
# 10
Bonnet, Marine • Sardini, Paul • Billon, Sophie • Siitari-Kauppi, Marja • Kuva, Jukka • (et. al.)
Abstract: These program codes are part of the manuscript entitled "Determining crack apertures distribution in rocks using 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method: experiments and simulations" by Bonnet et al. (2019)All the codes are including in one zip file. It contains:- one text file describing the content of the zip file {ReadMe.txt},- the program used under Geant4 for the simulations {Geant4_Program folder},- and the program used under the IDE Code::Blocks {CodeBlockEnergyProfiles.cpp}.
The method employed in the article, from which the programs were coded, is the 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method. The heart of the 14C-PMMA method consists of impregnating a sample with liquid 14C-labelled MethylMethAcrylate (14C-MMA), its subsequent polymerisation in the pore space, and autoradiography of the impregnated sample after sowing and polishing, giving a connected porosity map of the studied rock section. The method can also be adapted to determine crack apertures. In the article, we proposed an advanced calibration of the 14C-PMMA autoradiographic method for quantifying real crack apertures by taking into account the variability of tilt angle encountered in natural rock samples. To this aim, a set of artificial crack samples presenting different controlled apertures and tilt angles was used, as well as Monte Carlo simulations through Geant4 toolkit. Geant4 program was coded from the Example B1 available on the Geant4 website http://geant4-userdoc.web.cern.ch/geant4-userdoc/UsersGuides/ForApplicationDeveloper/html/Examples/BasicCodes.html#exmpbasic-b1 (Copyright (c) Copyright Holders of the Geant4 Collaboration, 1994-2006). The code has been modified to suit the desired purposes of the simulation. <br> The code used under the IDE::Blocks code is original and does not come from other codes or examples.
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