75 documents found in 371ms
# 1
Geiger, Tobias • Frieler, Katja • Bresch, David N.
Abstract: Tropical cyclones (TCs) pose a major risk to societies worldwide. While data on observed cyclones tracks (location of the center) and wind speeds is publicly available these data sets do not contain information about the spatial extent of the storm and people or assets exposed. Here, we apply a simplified wind field model to estimate all areas (grid cells) exposed to wind speeds above 34 knots. Based on available spatially-explicit data on population densities and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) we estimate 1) the number of people and 2) the sum of assets exposed to above tropical storm force wind speeds for temporal changes in historical distribution of population and assets (TCE-hist) and assuming fixed 2015 patterns (TCE-2015). The associated spatially-explicit exposure data (TCE-DAT) covers the period 1950 to 2015. It is considered key information to 1) assess the contribution of climatological versus socio-economic drivers of changes in exposure to tropical cyclones, 2) estimate changes in vulnerability from the difference in exposure and reported damages and calibrate associated damage functions, and 3) build improved exposure-based predictors to estimate higher-level societal impacts such as long-term effects on GDP, employment, or migration. We validate the adequateness of our methodology by comparing our exposure estimate to estimated exposure obtained from reported wind fields available since 1988 for the United States. We expect that the free availability of the underlying model and TCE-DAT will make research on tropical cyclone risks more accessible to non-experts and stakeholders. Files included in the zip folder: (1) TCE-DAT_single_events_historical.zip: Zipped archive containing 2707 files with exposed population and assets by grid cell using historical socio-economic exposure estimates.(2) TCE-DAT_single_events_2015.zip: Zipped archive containing 2713 files with exposed population and assets by grid cell using fixed socio-economic exposure at 2015 values.(3) Data-description_TCE-DAT_2017.008.pdf: full description of the data set including information on data sources and the description of variables/ data columns Additional information on each TC event in the zipped archive (e.g. TC name, NatCatSERVICE_ID, genesis_basin, aggregated exposure estimates by country) are available in the exposure data sets aggregated on country-event level (see Geiger et al., 2017; http://doi.org/10.5880/pik.2017.005 for details).
# 2
Geiger, Tobias • Frieler, Katja • Bresch, David N.
Abstract: Tropical cyclones (TCs) pose a major risk to societies worldwide. While data on observed cyclones tracks (location of the center) and wind speeds is publicly available these data sets do not contain information on the spatial extent of the storm and people or assets exposed. Here, we provide a collection of tropical cyclone exposure data (TCE-DAT) derived with the help of spatially-explicit data on population densities and Gross Domestic Product (GDP), also available at http://doi.org/10.5880/pik.2017.007. Up to now, this collection contains: 1) A global data set of tropical cyclone exposure accumulated to the country/event level http://doi.org/10.5880/pik.2017.0052) A global data set of spatially-explicit tropical cyclone exposure available for all TC events since 1950 http://doi.org/10.5880/pik.2017.008 TCE-DAT is considered key information to 1) assess the contribution of climatological versus socioeconomic drivers of changes in exposure to tropical cyclones, 2) estimate changes in vulnerability from the difference in exposure and reported damages and calibrate associated damage functions, and 3) build improved exposure-based predictors to estimate higher-level societal impacts such as long-term effects on GDP, employment, or migration. We expect that the free availability of the underlying model and TCE-DAT will make research on tropical cyclone risks more accessible to non-experts and stakeholders.
# 3
van den Ende, Martijn
Abstract: Intergranular pressure solution creep is an important deformation mechanism in the Earth’s crust. The phenomenon has been frequently studied and several analytical models have been proposed that describe its constitutive behavior. These models require assumptions regarding the geometry of the aggregate and the grain size distribution in order to solve for the contact stresses, and often neglect shear tractions. Furthermore, analytical models tend to overestimate experimental compaction rates at low porosities, an observation for which the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we present a conceptually simple, 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) approach for simulating intergranular pressure solution creep that explicitly models individual grains, relaxing many of the assumptions that are required by analytical models. The DEM model is validated against experiments by direct comparison of macroscopic sample compaction rates. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the overall DEM compaction rate to the grain size and applied stress is tested. The effects of the interparticle friction and of a distributed grain size on macroscopic strain rates are subsequently investigated. Overall, we find that the DEM model is capable of reproducing realistic compaction behavior, and that the strain rates produced by the model are in good agreement with uniaxial compaction experiments. Characteristic features, such as the dependence of the strain rate on grain size and applied stress, as predicted by analytical models, are also observed in the simulations. DEM results show that interparticle friction and a distributed grain size affect the compaction rates by less than half an order of magnitude. The zip-file Van-den-Ende_2017.018.zip contains several folders with raw data from the laboratory experiments, output data from Discrete Element Method simulations, and Python 2.7 script files that read and process these data. All data are stored in ASCII format.
# 4
Trippetta, Fabio • Carpenter, Brett M • Mollo, Silvio • Scuderi, Marco M. • Scarlato, Piergiorgio • (et. al.)
Abstract: Here we report the raw data of the physical properties of carbonate samples collected along the Monte Maggio normal Fault (MMF), a regional structure (length ~10 km and displacement ~500 m) located within the active system of the Apennines (Italy). In particular, we report results coming from large cores (100 mm in diameter and up to 20 cm long) drilled perpendicular to the fault plane made of Calcare Massiccio (massive limestone) and Bugarone fm (limestone with 8.3 % of clay). From these large cores, we obtained smaller cores, 38 mm in diameter both parallel and perpendicular to the fault plane, that have been used for experiments. We have divided the rock samples in four categories following the fault architecture. The four structural domains of the fault are:1) the hangingwall (HW) made of Bugarone fm that is still preserved in some portions of the fault, 2) a Cemented Cataclasite (CC) and 3) a Fault Breccia (FB) that characterize the cataclastic damage zones and 4) the correspondent undeformed protolith of the footwall block made of Calcare Massiccio. Raw data reported here are those used for drawing Figures 5, 6, 8 and 9 of the paper “Physical and transport property variations within carbonate- bearing fault zones: Insights from the Monte Maggio Fault (central Italy)”, http://doi.org/10.1002/ 2017GC007097 by Trippetta et al. Dataset_Fig05.txt reports P- and S-wave velocities (in km/s) of the described samples at pressure from 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) up to 100 MPa at ambient temperature in dry conditions and the corresponding Vp/Vs ratio. Experiments have been performed by using the permeameter at the HP-HT Laboratory of experimental Volcanology and Geophysics at INGV (Rome). Dataset_Fig06.txt reports permeability data (in m^2) on the same type of samples of fig05 for the same range of confining pressure at ambient temperature. Pore pressure values athletes each confining pressure step are indicated in the file. Data have been again acquired with the permeameter. Dataset_Fig08.txt reports P-wave velocity data (in km/s) vs depth (in m), recorded on the portion that crossed the Calare Massiccio fm of three boreholes drilled in the Apennines: Varoni 1, Monte Civitello 1 and Daniel1. Data have been obtained by digitalizing each pdf file of the boreholes mentioned above, that are available at http://unmig.sviluppoeconomico.gov.it/videpi/videpi.asp. Once digitalized, respect to the original pdf file, velocity data have been simply converted from um/f to km/s. Dataset_Fig09.txt reports values of the maximum, minimum and average values of Critical fault nucleation length (in m) at each corresponding depth (in m) and applied confining pressure (in MPa). Critical nucleation lengths have been calculated by using the equations described in the text of the Trippetta et al paper and by using the elastic parameters calculated from data reported here. Data on earthquakes-depth distribution of the 2009 L'Aquila sequence can be found on Chiaraluce et al. (2011).
# 5
Kennett, Douglas J. • Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M. • Aquino, Valorie V. • Lechleitner, Franziska • Ridley, Harriet E. • (et. al.)
Abstract: The proxy record is derived from stalagmite YOK-I from the Yok Balum Cave, Belize. Stalagmite YOK-I was collected in June 2006, ca. 160 m from the western cave entrance. Carbonate was actively precipitating on the tip of this 606.9-mm-long stalagmite when it was collected. The stable isotope climate record covers only the upper 415 mm, while the lower stalagmite section is less suitable for stable isotope studies and was not included in this investigation. Over 4,200 δ18O and δ13C measurements were performed on the upper 415 mm of YOK-I and dated between 40 BC and 2006 AD. The samples were continuously milled at 0.1 mm increments and, depending on growth rate changes in YOK-I, the temporal resolution of the isotopic data fluctuates from 0.01 and 3.68 yrs/0.1 mm, with an average resolution of 0.49 yrs/0.1 mm. Earlier versions of the dataset have been published at the NOAA palaeoclimate data server using a slightly different chronology (Kennett et al., Science 2012, DOI:10.1126/science.1226299). In the study of Ridley et al. (Nat Geo 2015, DOI:10.1038/ngeo2353), we have tuned the chronology of YOK-I with the more precise one of the stalagmite YOK-G. These new data is provided as version 2 in the files YOK-I_d18O_v2.csv (for δ18O) and YOK-I_d13C_v2.csv (for δ13C), consisting of 4047 isotope measurements. Kernel filtering was applied to resample the time series to equidistant annual resolution (Smirnov et al, Sci Rep XXX, DOI: XXX), covering the time span from 15 BC to 2005 AD, resulting in 2021 data values. These filtered versions of the data are provided as files YOK-I_d18O_kernelfiltered.csv and YOK-I_d13C_kernelfiltered.csv. In all files, the first column consists of the age (in yr AD) and the second column (separated from the first column by a semicolon) is the corresponding isotope value (in permil VPDB). The data is presented as four .csv files in a .zip folder.
# 6
Reyer, Christopher • Asrar, Gassem • Betts, Richard • Chang, Jinfeng • Chen, Min • (et. al.)
Abstract: The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a set of consistent, multi-sector, multi-scale climate-impact simulations, based on scientifically and politically-relevant historical and future scenarios. This framework serves as a basis for robust projections of climate impacts, as well as facilitating model evaluation and improvement, allowing for improved estimates of the biophysical and socio-economic impacts of climate change at different levels of global warming. It also provides a unique opportunity to consider interactions between climate change impacts across sectors. ISIMIP2a is the second ISIMIP simulation round, focusing on historical simulations (1971-2010) of climate impacts on agriculture, fisheries, permafrost, biomes, regional and global water and forests. This will serve as a basis for model evaluation and improvement, allowing for improved estimates of the biophysical and socio-economic impacts of climate change at different levels of global warming. The focus topic for ISIMIP2a is model validation, in particular with respect to the representation of impacts of extreme weather events and climate variability. During this phase, four common global observational climate data sets were provided across all impact models and sectors. In addition, appropriate observational data sets of impacts for each sector were collected, against which the models can be benchmarked. Access to all these data is provided through a central ISIMIP archive (see https://www.isimip.org/gettingstarted/#input-data-bias-correction). The ISIMIP2a biome outputs are based on simulations from 8 global vegetation (biomes) models (CARAIB, DLEM, JULES-B1, LPJ-GUESS, LPJmL, ORCHIDEE, VEGAS, VISIT) according to the ISIMIP2a protocol (https://www.isimip.org/protocol/#isimip2a).
The ISIMIP2a biome outputs are based on simulations by different global vegetation models (CARAIB, DLEM, JULES-UoE, LPJ-GUESS, LPJmL, ORCHIDEE, VEGAS, VISIT) following the ISIMIP2a protocol. The biome models simulate biogeochemical processes, biogeography and ecosystem dynamics of natural vegetation and managed lands based on soil, climate and land-use information. A more detailed description of the models and model-specific amendments of the protocol are available here: https://www.isimip.org/impactmodels/.
# 7
Gosling, Simon • Müller Schmied, Hannes • Betts, Richard • Chang, Jinfeng • Ciais, Philippe • (et. al.)
Abstract: The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a set of consistent, multi-sector, multi-scale climate-impact simulations, based on scientifically and politically-relevant historical and future scenarios. This framework serves as a basis for robust projections of climate impacts, as well as facilitating model evaluation and improvement, allowing for improved estimates of the biophysical and socio-economic impacts of climate change at different levels of global warming. It also provides a unique opportunity to consider interactions between climate change impacts across sectors. ISIMIP2a is the second ISIMIP simulation round, focusing on historical simulations (1971-2010 approx.) of climate impacts on agriculture, fisheries, permafrost, biomes, regional and global water and forests. This may serve as a basis for model evaluation and improvement, allowing for improved estimates of the biophysical and socio-economic impacts of climate change at different levels of global warming. The focus topic for ISIMIP2a is model evaluation and validation, in particular with respect to the representation of impacts of extreme weather events and climate variability. During this phase, four common global observational climate data sets were provided across all impact models and sectors. In addition, appropriate observational data sets of impacts for each sector were collected, against which the models can be benchmarked. Access to the input data for the impact models is provided through a central ISIMIP archive (see https://www.isimip.org/gettingstarted/#input-data-bias-correction). This entry refers to the ISIMIP2a simulation data from global hydrology models: CLM4, DBH, H08, JULES_W1, JULES_B1, LPJmL, MATSIRO, MPI-HM, ORCHIDEE, PCR-GLOBWB, SWBM, VIC, WaterGAP2.
The ISIMIP2a water (global) outputs are based on simulations from 13 global hydrology models (see listing) according to the ISIMIP2a protocol (https://www.isimip.org/protocol/#isimip2a). The models simulate hydrological processes and dynamics (part of the models also considering human water abstractions and reservoir regulation) based on climate and physio-geographical information. A more detailed description of the models and model-specific amendments of the protocol are available here: https://www.isimip.org/impactmodels/.
# 8
Sembroni, Andrea • Kiraly, Agnes • Faccenna, Claudio • Funiciello, Francesca • Becker, Thorsten W. • (et. al.)
Abstract: We present videos and figures from 22 scaled analogue models used to investigate the interactions between a density anomaly rising in the mantle and the lithosphere in a Newtonian system. The experimental setup consists of a two layers viscous lithosphere-upper mantle system obtained by using silicone putty-glucose syrup in a tank sized 40 cm × 40 cm× 50 cm. Glucose syrup (i.e., mantle) is a Newtonian, low viscosity, high-density fluid while silicone putty (i.e., lithosphere) is a visco-elastic material that behaves in a quasi-Newtonian fashion. The mantle upwelling (i.e., plume head) is produced by a high viscosity, low-density silicone sphere with a constant radius (15 mm) rising through the mantle at an average rise velocity of ~2.6 mm/s. A side-view camera images the ascending path of the sphere, allowing to track the sphere location and compute its velocity. A top-view, 3-D scanner records the evolution of topography from which the lithospheric uplift rate is inferred. All details about the model set-up, modeling results and interpretation are detailed in Sembroni et al. (2017). The additional material presented in this publication includes 2 tables, 5 figures, and 23 time-lapse movie. The rheological properties of materials used in each model are listed in Table 1.Table 2 is an excel file where the raw data of the models are specified (i.e., bulge width, topography, and uplift rate). Such data have been obtained by the 3-D scanner and then processed by a MATLAB code.Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5 represent the 2-D topography evolution of the bulge in each experiment. Images have been grouped by considering the different experimental setups (i.e., homogeneous continental lithosphere - Figure 1, homogeneous oceanic lithosphere - Figure 2, low viscous decoupling layer - Figure 3, intermediate viscous decoupling layer - Figure 4, high viscous decoupling layer - Figure 5). Such figures consist of topographic profiles extracted from the surface obtained by the 3-D scanner in four different time steps (red numbers in the figures). 22 side-view videos (from Movie 1 to Movie 22) show the progress of the models from the releasing to the impingement of the sphere beneath the plate. The velocity of the video has been accelerated by a factor of 7. While, the first 22 movies show the evolution of the experiments, Movie 23 shows the mantle convective flow associated to the ascending path of the mantle upwelling. Such flow has been detected by tracking the bubbles inside the syrup. In this model, no lithosphere has been placed on top of the syrup.
# 9
Hinzen, Klaus-G. • Fleischer, Claus
Abstract: Engineering seismological models (incl. ground amplification and topographic effects) of key structures in Tiryns and Midea, Greece, will be used to test the hypothesis of seismogenic causes of the decline of the Mycenaean settlements in the 12th century BC.
# 10
Bernd Schurr • Anke Dannowski • Branislav Glavatovic • Llambro Duni • Heidrun Kopp • (et. al.)
Abstract: Raw-, SEG-Y and other supplementary data of the landside deployment from the amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment ALPHA are presented. The aim of this project was to reveal the crustal and lithospheric structure of the subducting Adriatic plate and the external accretionary wedge in the southern Dinarides. Airgun shots from the RV Meteor were recorded along two profiles across Montenegro and northern Albania.
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