18 documents found in 182ms
# 1
Kövesligethy Radó Seismological Observatory (Geodetic and Geophysical Institute, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA CSFK GGI KRSZO))
Abstract: The Hungarian National Seismological Network (HNSN) is a permanent seismological network operated by the Kövesligethy Radó Seismological Observatory (Geodetic and Geophysical Institute, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences). The main purpose of the network is the continuous monitoring of the seismicity of Hungary and to provide high quality data for the seismological and geodynamic scientific research. The first digital seismological station of the HNSN started its operation in 1992. The network covers the entire Hungarian territory although the geometry is driven by the topography. Most of the stations are concentrated in hilly/mountain regions to move away from the human related activities and to avoid basin effects. All data are acquired in real-time to the HNSN data centre located at the Kövesligethy Radó Seismological Observatory in Budapest. The HNSN follows an open data policy, seismic waveform data are available in real time without any restriction within from the HNSN data centre as well as from the European Integrated Data Archive via the GEOFON data centre.
# 2
Friederich, W. • Meier, T.
Abstract: The network, which consisted of both land and ocean bottom seismographs, functioned from October 2005 until its deinstallation in March 2007 as part of the Exploring the Geodynamics of Subducted Lithosphere Using an Amphibian Deployment of Seismographs (EGELADOS) project. The network, which covered the entire southern Aegean Sea from the Peloponnesus region in the west to western Turkey in the east, was designed to study seismicity as well as the distribution of the elastic and anelastic material properties in the Hellenic subduction zone to better understand its complex geotectonic setting and evolution. The network encompassed 45 Güralp 60-second seismometers, four Streckeisen STS-2 seismometers, and seven 1-Hertz Mark seismometers at land sites. The seismometers were supplemented by 22 ocean bottom seismographs equipped with Güralp 60- second seismometers and broadband hydrophones. In addition, the network was designed to incorporate the seven permanent broadband seismographs of the GeoForschungsNetz (GEOFON) network and one Mediterranean Very Broadband Seismographic Network (MedNet) station. Waveform data is available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code Z3, and is fully open.
# 3
GEOFON Data Centre
Abstract: GEOFON (GEOFOrschungsNetz) is the global seismological broad-band network operated by the German GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). The GEOFON seismic network came into being in 1993 as one of the three pillars of the GEOFON program dedicated to Ernst von Rebeur-Paschwitz, proposer of a global earthquake monitoring system, who recorded the first teleseismic seismogram in Potsdam in 1889. The program and its seismic network were created to provide high quality broad-band data for scientific use and foster common standards in the seismological community. The network has evolved towards real-time data acquisition and distribution while keeping the high quality broad-band data in focus. Today the network plays a leading role in global real-time seismology providing valuable data for almost all fundamental and applied global/regional seismological research projects at GFZ and the wider seismological community. The GEOFON network is operated jointly with more than 50 international partners and in 2014 consists of about 80 active stations on all continents, but concentrated in Europe and the Mediterranean region as well as in the Indian Ocean. Station operation is mostly performed by local partners with GFZ guidance and logistic support, allowing the global network to be well-advanced technically while still extremely cost-effective. All stations are equipped with broad-band sensors (generally STS-2) that allow resolution of the complete seismic spectrum from small high-frequency local earthquakes to the largest global earthquakes. Data from all stations are freely redistributed in real-time for earthquake monitoring and tsunami warning centers immediately after acquisition at the GEOFON data centre via wired or satellite links. Archived data is also available. GEOFON is part of the Modular Earth Science Infrastructure (MESI) housed at GFZ.
# 4
San Fernando Royal Naval Observatory (ROA) • Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) • Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) • Universidade de Evora (UEVORA, Portugal) • Institute Scientifique of RABAT (ISRABAT, Morocco)
Abstract: The Western Mediterranean Network (WM) is a regional seismological broad-band network deployed around the Ibero-Maghrebian area as a collaboration between two Spanish institutions, the San Fernando Royal Naval Observatory (ROA) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), being daily operated by ROA. The first WM station (SFUC) was installed by ROA and UCM in 1996 with the collaboration of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). WM code was assigned in 2005 by FDSN. The WM seismic network was created to provide high quality broad-band data for scientific use and contribute to national and international data centres for seismic monitoring. Since 1996 other partners came to WM net: GFZ, the Universidade de Evora (UEVORA, Portugal) and the Institute Scientifique of RABAT (ISRABAT, Morocco). The network has evolved towards real-time data acquisition and distribution between partners and other institutions while keeping the high quality broad-band data in focus, playing a leading role in the Ibero-Maghrebian seismic studies, providing valuable data for almost all fundamental and applied regional seismological research joint projects at ROA, UCM, the other WM partners, and other institutes. The standard stations are equipped with broad-band sensors (generally STS-2 or STS-2.5, although two of them have installed Guralp sensors) that allow resolution of the complete seismic spectrum from small high-frequency local earthquakes to the largest global earthquakes, high resolution digitizers (Quanterra or Earthdata), and SeisComP with seedlink software for real-time communications. Also, some stations are equipped with accelerometers (Episensor) and also a permanent geodetic GPS are co-installed at the same places.
# 5
ESI SAS (Earth Science Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences)
Abstract: The Earth Sciences Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences (ESI SAS) operates the National Network of Seismic Stations (NNSS) and analyzes instrumental and macroseismic data from earthquakes. The main purpose of the instrumental network is the continuous monitoring of the seismicity of Slovakia and providing high quality data for the seismological scientific research. The first seismographic station of the territory of Slovakia has been installed in 1902. The first digital seismological station of the NNSS has started its operation in 1990. Currently the network consists of six short period and five broadband stations. The broadband stations are equipped with Streckeisen STS-2, Guralp CMG-6T and Kirnos SKD-30s sensors; the short period stations are equipped with Lennartz LE-3D and Guralp CMG-40T. All stations have real-time data acquisition. The data centre of the NNSS is located at the Earth Sciences Institute in Bratislava. The data are collected by the SeisComp3 software package and a SeedLink server is used for the international data exchange. The NNSS follows an open data policy, seismic waveform data are available in real time without any restriction from the NNSS data centre as well as from the European Integrated Data Archive via the GEOFON data centre.
# 6
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)
Abstract: The AWI Network Antarctica is a local to regional seismological network around the German research base Neumayer Station in Dronning Maud Land, a coastal region in eastern Antarctica. The network is providing high quality data for scientific research and monitoring regional seismicity in East Antarctica, which is generally believed to be seismically inactive. However, the station coverage in Antarctica is in general sparse and small magnitude local events remain undetected by global seismic networks. The AW network increases the station coverage substantially and has the potential to reveal regional earthquakes and cryogenic events. By 2016 the network consists of 3 stations transmitting data in real-time and 4 stations, which are only accessible in the archive. Stations are equipped with three-component broadband sensors buried in snow pits or on outcropping bedrock if present. An additional small aperture array of vertical short-period sensors was installed in 1996. Between 1993 and 1999 digital data are provided as triggered event segments only, after 1999 continuous data sets are available. Stations might have larger data gaps during the austral winter, when power supply is limited. All data are freely distributed by the GEOFON data center.
# 7
Wigger, P. • Salazar, P. • Kummerow, J. • Bloch, W. • Asch, G. • (et. al.)
Abstract: We installed a temporary seismic network that consists of two sub-nets in order to monitor micro-seismicity at the Atacama and West Fissure Fault System in Northern Chile. The net around the West Fissure Fault System was operated during the period between November 2005 and November 2009 and again from March 2010 until March 2012. The net around the Atacama Fault System recorded from March 2010 to March 2012. Both sub-nets consist of surface stations with 3-component seismometers of type Mark L4-1Hz. The data recording is continuous at a sample rate of 200Hz, with a few time intervals recorded at only 100 Hz. Data loggers are Earth Data PR-24. Power is supplied by 60W solar panels with a 12V battery backup. The seismic monitoring system around the West Fissure Fault System covers an area of approx. 100 times 80 km at elevations between 3000m and 5000m a.s.l. and consists of an average of 11 seismic stations. The seismic monitoring system around the Atacama Fault System covers an area of approx. 40 times 30km around the Salar Grande salt lake at elevations between 600m and 1000m a.s.l. and consists of 10 surface stations. The network recorded waveforms of over 7,000 weak seismic events. These microearthquakes witness a variety of seismogenic processes such as deformation due to tectonic stress, fluid migration or metamorphic mineral reactions. They occur along major fault zones mapped at the surface, in the continental crust, at the interface between the South American and the Nazca plate and in the oceanic crust and mantle. Waveform data is available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code 8F, and is {embargoed until Jan 2022}.
# 8
Asch, Günter • Heit, Benjamin • Yuan, Xiaohui
Abstract: A set of 60 seismological stations (45 short period and 15 broadband) was installed at 21°S between the coast in Chile (70°W) and the Eastern Cordillera in Bolivia (64°W) along a 600 km long profile and operated during two years in the Central Andes region. The stations operating at a rate of 50 samples per second (sps) recorded large and local events as well as quarry blasts from the copper mines in the vicinity of the profile. The results will be used to improve the crust velocity model and to identify the Andean shear zones and their extension to the west. In addition, a shorter profile consisting of 20 stations (10 short period and 10 broadband) was installed in Argentina along a 200 km profile at 26°S with the aim to investigate lithospheric delamination across the Cerro Galan caldera, one of the most prominent intra-plate volcanoes in the world. The instruments recorded local and teleseismic events during two years and were used to map the Moho and LAB, as well as to investigate the Galan Caldera by teleseismic tomography.
# 9
Oth, Adrien • Barrière, Julien • d’Oreye, Nicolas • Mavonga, Georges • Subira, Josue • (et. al.)
Abstract: KivuSNet represents the first dense broadband seismic network installed in the Kivu Rift region, which is located in the bordering region of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda. Here the active volcanoes Nyamulagira (the most active in Africa) and Nyiragongo (host to the largest persistent lava lake on Earth) threaten the city of Goma and neighbouring agglomerations, and destructive earthquakes can also affect the region. The deployement started with the first stations in 2012/2013 and since October 2015, 13 stations are operated with real-time data transmission. The development of KivuSNet has been carried out in the framework of several research projects and is in particular associated with the project REmote Sensing and In Situ detection and Tracking of geohazards (RESIST), funded by the Belgian Science Policy and the National Research Fund of Luxembourg. KivuSNet aims at opening a new window for the seismological knowledge in this highly active rifting region, allowing for unprecedented insights into tectonic and volcanic seismicity, tremor patterns and Earth structure as well as for sustainable real-time monitoring of the volcanoes in the area. Together with the often co-located KivuGNet geodetic stations, KivuSNet closes a dramatic observational gap in this region. Waveform data is available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code KV, and is embargoed.
# 10
Meier, T. • Bohnhoff, M. • Harjes, H.-P.
Abstract: The focus of the two temporary seismic networks CYCNET and LIBNET was to monitor the south Aegean region which has the highest seismic activity in Europe. The knowledge of seismotectonics of the volcanic arc of the Hellenic subduction zone poses a number of questions that can best be addressed via an investigation of the spatiotemporal distribution of hypocenters. In order to obtain hypocenters with small location errors and low detection threshold the CYClades seismic NETwork (CYCNET) was installed in the central volcanic arc of the Hellenic subduction zone. Up to 22 stations, equipped with short-period and broadband sensors, were distributed on 17 islands and operating for more than two years starting in autumn 2002. Most islands were equipped with a single seismic station. To decrease the detection threshold at the volcanic centers of Milos and Santorini additional stations were installed there. The combination of short-period and broadband sensors provides data for both seismicity studies and structural investigations. Focussing on the Santorini-Amorgos zone the University of Hamburg (Dahm, T., Hensch, M.) deployed 6 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS)(SANT1-SANT6) near the submarine volcano Columbo for about two month in 2005. In order to better resolve seismic activity in the region of the forearc slivers between the Ptolemy-, Pliny- and Strabo-Trenches south of Crete and to map the subducting African lithosphere in this region as well as the southern termination of the seismogenic zone the LIByan sea the seismic offshore NETwork (LIBNET) was installed. This network consisting of up to 6 simultaneously recording Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) was operated from May 2003 until June 2004 in five subsequent deployment phases. Waveform data are available from the GEOFON data centre, under network code ZZ, and are fully open.
spinning wheel Loading next page