14 documents found in 217ms
# 1
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1i), 8732-9101 m.
# 2
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1h), 7392-8728 m.
# 3
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1g), 7220-8322 m.
# 4
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1d), 6770-7218 m.
# 5
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1a), 5596-6760 m.
# 6
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: Infrared-Spectrometry on Cutting Samples of the KTB Main Hole (Drill Section HB1), 7-5590 m.
# 7
Sawatari, H.
Abstract: Major and trace elements in the 100 m drilling core samples from Lake Baikal have been determined by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry), ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis). In this paper, vertical distribution profiles of the determined elements are presented. Raw analytical values will be presented elsewhere. Vertical distribution patterns for Ti, Al, Fe, Mn, Ca and Pare shown in Fig.1. In the bottom surface sample (=the uppermost part of the core), the concentration of Al, Ti, Fe and Ca are relatively low and that of P is relatively high. It may indicate that relative large volume of biogenic organic substances are included in the bottom surface sample. In addition, it seems that the Mn contents are relatively low and its deviation is rather small between 60 m and 90 m from the bottom.
# 8
Fietz, Susanne • Sturm, Michael • Nicklisch, Andreas
Abstract: Calculations were based on factors established for 89 water samples across Lake Baikal in July 2001 (see text). The traps were deployed for about 16 months and the core top spanned c. 7 years (see text).According to the contribution to the chlorophyll a-model shown in Eq. (1), the chlorophyll a content in the water of the south basin in July 2001 was composed of 30% Bacillariophyceae plus Chrysophyceae, 44% Chlorophyta, and 26% cyanobacterial picoplankton. In the 40-m trap, in contrast, 87% of the chlorophyll a originated from Bacillariophyceae plus Chrysophyceae, 11% from Chlorophyta, and 2% from cyanobacterial picoplankton (Fig. 5). The percentage contribution did not change with the water depth, as the same composition was found in the deepest traps (Fig. 5).
# 9
Fietz, Susanne • Sturm, Michael • Nicklisch, Andreas
Abstract: Fig. 4 visualises differences in the degradation between the organic compounds, chlorophylls, and carbon. The chlorophyll a/carbon ratio decreased with depth, indicating that organic carbon is more slowly degraded than chlorophyll a (Table 6 and Fig. 4), whereas the pheophytin a/carbon ratio and the pyropheophytin a/carbon ratio increased with the depth, indicating the formation of pheophytin and pyropheophytin with depth (Table 6 and Fig. 4). Best fits for the chlorophyllide a/carbon ratio and pheophorbide a/carbon ratio vs. depth were also linear regression models, but they were not significant (Fig. 4).
# 10
Fietz, Susanne • Sturm, Michael • Nicklisch, Andreas
Abstract: The traps were deployed for about 16 months. The respective regression equations and its coefficients of determination (r2) are reported in Table 5.In the 40-m trap, fucoxanthin was the dominant carotenoid (Table 1 and Fig. 3). Other pigments of Bacillariophyceae plus Chrysophyceae (chlorophyll c, diadinoxanthin, and diatoxanthin) as well as the cyanobacterial zeaxanthin also showed high sedimentation rates, whereas the chlorophyte chlorophyll b and lutein, as well as the cryptophyte alloxanthin, sedimented only in low amounts (Table 1 and Fig. 3). Abbreviations: Chl—chlorophyll, Fuco—fucoxanthin, Zea—zeaxanthin, β-car—β-carotene, Allo—alloxan
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