48 documents found in 292ms
# 1
Ziegler, Moritz • Heidbach, Oliver
Abstract: The distribution of data records for the maximum horizontal stress orientation S_Hmax in the Earth’s crust is sparse and very unequally. To analyse the stress pattern and its wavelength and to predict the mean S_Hmax orientation on regular grids, statistical interpolation as conducted e.g. by Coblentz and Richardson (1995), Müller et al. (2003), Heidbach and Höhne (2008), Heidbach et al. (2010) or Reiter et al. (2014) is necessary. Based on their work we wrote the Matlab® script Stress2Grid that provides several features to analyse the mean S_Hmax pattern. The script facilitates and speeds up this analysis and extends the functionality compared to the publications mentioned before. This script is the update of Stress2Grid v1.0 (Ziegler and Heidbach, 2017). It provides two different concepts to calculate the mean S_Hmax orientation on regular grids. The first is using a fixed search radius around the grid points and computes the mean S_Hmax orientation if sufficient data records are within the search radius. The larger the search radius the larger is the filtered wavelength of the stress pattern. The second approach is using variable search radii and determines the search radius for which the standard deviation of the mean S_Hmax orientation is below a given threshold. This approach delivers mean S_Hmax orientations with a user-defined degree of reliability. It resolves local stress perturbations and is not available in areas with conflicting information that result in a large standard deviation. Furthermore, the script can also estimate the deviation between plate motion direction and the mean S_Hmax orientation. The script is fully documented by the accompanying WSM Technical Report 19/02 (Ziegler and Heidbach, 2019) which includes a changelog in the beginning.
# 2
Ziegler, Moritz • Heidbach, Oliver
Abstract: The distribution of data records for the maximum horizontal stress orientation SHmax in the Earth’s crust is sparse and very unequally. In order to analyse the stress pattern and its wavelength or to predict the mean SHmax orientation on a regular grid, statistical interpolation as conducted e.g. by Coblentz and Richardson (1995), Müller et al. (2003), Heidbach and Höhne (2008), Heidbach et al. (2010) or Reiter et al. (2014) is necessary. Based on their work we wrote the Matlab® script Stress2Grid that provides several features to analyse the mean SHmax pattern. The script facilitates and speeds up this analysis and extends the functionality compared to aforementioned publications. The script is complemented by a number of example and input files as described in the WSM Technical Report (Ziegler and Heidbach, 2017, http://doi.org/10.2312/wsm.2017.002). The script provides two different concepts to calculate the mean SHmax orientation on a regular grid. The first is using a fixed search radius around the grid point and computes the mean SHmax orientation if sufficient data records are within the search radius. The larger the search radius the larger is the filtered wavelength of the stress pattern. The second approach is using variable search radii and determines the search radius for which the variance of the mean SHmax orientation is below a given threshold. This approach delivers mean SHmax orientations with a user-defined degree of reliability. It resolves local stress perturbations and is not available in areas with conflicting information that result in a large variance. Furthermore, the script can also estimate the deviation between plate motion direction and the mean SHmax orientation.
# 3
van den Ende, Martijn
Abstract: Intergranular pressure solution creep is an important deformation mechanism in the Earth’s crust. The phenomenon has been frequently studied and several analytical models have been proposed that describe its constitutive behavior. These models require assumptions regarding the geometry of the aggregate and the grain size distribution in order to solve for the contact stresses, and often neglect shear tractions. Furthermore, analytical models tend to overestimate experimental compaction rates at low porosities, an observation for which the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we present a conceptually simple, 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) approach for simulating intergranular pressure solution creep that explicitly models individual grains, relaxing many of the assumptions that are required by analytical models. The DEM model is validated against experiments by direct comparison of macroscopic sample compaction rates. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the overall DEM compaction rate to the grain size and applied stress is tested. The effects of the interparticle friction and of a distributed grain size on macroscopic strain rates are subsequently investigated. Overall, we find that the DEM model is capable of reproducing realistic compaction behavior, and that the strain rates produced by the model are in good agreement with uniaxial compaction experiments. Characteristic features, such as the dependence of the strain rate on grain size and applied stress, as predicted by analytical models, are also observed in the simulations. DEM results show that interparticle friction and a distributed grain size affect the compaction rates by less than half an order of magnitude. The zip-file Van-den-Ende_2017.018.zip contains several folders with raw data from the laboratory experiments, output data from Discrete Element Method simulations, and Python 2.7 script files that read and process these data. All data are stored in ASCII format.
# 4
Trippetta, Fabio • Carpenter, Brett M • Mollo, Silvio • Scuderi, Marco M. • Scarlato, Piergiorgio • (et. al.)
Abstract: Here we report the raw data of the physical properties of carbonate samples collected along the Monte Maggio normal Fault (MMF), a regional structure (length ~10 km and displacement ~500 m) located within the active system of the Apennines (Italy). In particular, we report results coming from large cores (100 mm in diameter and up to 20 cm long) drilled perpendicular to the fault plane made of Calcare Massiccio (massive limestone) and Bugarone fm (limestone with 8.3 % of clay). From these large cores, we obtained smaller cores, 38 mm in diameter both parallel and perpendicular to the fault plane, that have been used for experiments. We have divided the rock samples in four categories following the fault architecture. The four structural domains of the fault are:1) the hangingwall (HW) made of Bugarone fm that is still preserved in some portions of the fault, 2) a Cemented Cataclasite (CC) and 3) a Fault Breccia (FB) that characterize the cataclastic damage zones and 4) the correspondent undeformed protolith of the footwall block made of Calcare Massiccio. Raw data reported here are those used for drawing Figures 5, 6, 8 and 9 of the paper “Physical and transport property variations within carbonate- bearing fault zones: Insights from the Monte Maggio Fault (central Italy)”, http://doi.org/10.1002/ 2017GC007097 by Trippetta et al. Dataset_Fig05.txt reports P- and S-wave velocities (in km/s) of the described samples at pressure from 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) up to 100 MPa at ambient temperature in dry conditions and the corresponding Vp/Vs ratio. Experiments have been performed by using the permeameter at the HP-HT Laboratory of experimental Volcanology and Geophysics at INGV (Rome). Dataset_Fig06.txt reports permeability data (in m^2) on the same type of samples of fig05 for the same range of confining pressure at ambient temperature. Pore pressure values athletes each confining pressure step are indicated in the file. Data have been again acquired with the permeameter. Dataset_Fig08.txt reports P-wave velocity data (in km/s) vs depth (in m), recorded on the portion that crossed the Calare Massiccio fm of three boreholes drilled in the Apennines: Varoni 1, Monte Civitello 1 and Daniel1. Data have been obtained by digitalizing each pdf file of the boreholes mentioned above, that are available at http://unmig.sviluppoeconomico.gov.it/videpi/videpi.asp. Once digitalized, respect to the original pdf file, velocity data have been simply converted from um/f to km/s. Dataset_Fig09.txt reports values of the maximum, minimum and average values of Critical fault nucleation length (in m) at each corresponding depth (in m) and applied confining pressure (in MPa). Critical nucleation lengths have been calculated by using the equations described in the text of the Trippetta et al paper and by using the elastic parameters calculated from data reported here. Data on earthquakes-depth distribution of the 2009 L'Aquila sequence can be found on Chiaraluce et al. (2011).
# 5
Quinteros, Javier
Abstract: This service provides routing information for distributed data centres, in the case where multiple different seismic data centres offer access to data and products using compatible types of services. Examples of the data and product objects are seismic timeseries waveforms, station inventory, or quality parameters from the waveforms. The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA) is an example of a set of distributed data centres (the EIDA „nodes“). EIDA have offered Arclink and Seedlink services for many years, and now offers FDSN web services, for accessing their holdings. In keeping with the distributed nature of EIDA, these services could run at different nodes or elsewhere; even on computers from normal users. Depending on the type of service, these may only provide information about a reduced subset of all the available waveforms. To be effective, the Routing Service must know the locations of all services integrated into a system and serve this information in order to help the development of smart clients and/or services at a higher level, which can offer the user an integrated view of the entire system (EIDA), hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is intended to be open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication.
# 6
Lu, Biao • Luo, Zhicai • Zhong, Bo • Zhou, Hao • Förste, Christoph • (et. al.)
Abstract: IGGT_R1 is a static gravity field model based on the second invariant of the GOCE gravitational gradient tensor, up to degree and order 240. Based on tensor theory, three invariants of the gravitational gradient tensor (IGGT) are independent of the gradiometer reference frame (GRF). Compared to traditional methods for calculation of gravity field models based on GOCE data, which are affected by errors in the attitude indicator, using IGGT and least squares method avoids the problem of inaccurate rotation matrices. IGGT_R1 is the first experiment to use this method to build a real gravity field model by using GOCE gravitational gradients. This new model has been developed by Wuhan University (WHU), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) and Zhengzhou Information Engineering University (IEU). More details about the gravity field model IGGT_R1 is given in our paper “The gravity field model IGGT_R1 based on the second invariant of the GOCE gravitational gradient tensor” (Lu et al., 2017, http://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-017-1089-8). This work is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (No. 201506270158), the Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104014, 41131067, 41374023, 41474019 and 41504013) and the Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Geodesy, Ministry Education, Wuhan University (No. 16-02-07).
# 7
Hinzen, Klaus-G. • Fleischer, Claus
Abstract: Engineering seismological models (incl. ground amplification and topographic effects) of key structures in Tiryns and Midea, Greece, will be used to test the hypothesis of seismogenic causes of the decline of the Mycenaean settlements in the 12th century BC.
# 8
Bernd Schurr • Anke Dannowski • Branislav Glavatovic • Llambro Duni • Heidrun Kopp • (et. al.)
Abstract: Raw-, SEG-Y and other supplementary data of the landside deployment from the amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment ALPHA are presented. The aim of this project was to reveal the crustal and lithospheric structure of the subducting Adriatic plate and the external accretionary wedge in the southern Dinarides. Airgun shots from the RV Meteor were recorded along two profiles across Montenegro and northern Albania.
# 9
Andreas Köhler • Christian Weidle • Christopher Nuth
Abstract: Climatic change is of incredible importance in the polar regions as ice-sheets and glaciers respond strongly to change in average temperature. The analysis of seismic signals (icequakes) emitted by glaciers (i.e., cryo-seismology) is thus gaining importance as a tool for monitoring glacier activity. To understand the scaling relation between regional glacier-related seismicity and actual small-scale local glacier dynamics and to calibrate the identified classes of icequakes to locally observed waveforms, a temporary passive seismic monitoring experiment was conducted in the vicinity of the calving front of Kronebreen, one of the fastest tidewater glaciers on Svalbard (Fig. 1). By combining the local observations with recordings of the nearby GEOFON station GE.KBS, the local experiment provides an ideal link between local observations at the glacier to regional scale monitoring of NW Spitsbergen. During the 4-month operation period from May to September 2013, eight broadband seismometers and three 4-point short-period arrays were operating around the glacier front of Kronebreen.
# 10
Ritter, Malte C. • Rosenau, Matthias • Oncken, Onno
Abstract: This dataset is supplementary material to the article of Ritter et al. (2017). In this article, the similarity of fault propagation work in analogue sandbox experiments to natural fault networks is investigated through measurements in a strike-slip sandbox and in a ring-shear-tester. The transient shear strength of the samples is measured for different fault lengths and from this the work is determined. For a detailed description of the procedure and the set-up please see Ritter et al. (2017). The data available in this supplementary publication are:• For the strike-slip experiments three video sequences of the deformation together with the evolution of boundary force for fault lengths of 20 cm, 30 cm and 40 cm. The videos show the curl of the deformation field, determined by Digital Image Correlation of top-view video images. These files are in AVI-format and included in the zip folder 2017-005-Ritter-movies.zip.• A folder containing force vs. displacement measurements for each experiment (2017-005-Ritter-forces.zip). These are 25 ASCII-files that contain two columns of numerical data: the first column is the displacement in meter; the second column is the corresponding force in newton. The files are named according to the following pattern: <fault length in meter>_<experiment number>.asc• A Matlab script to load the force files and calculate the work. This file is called “plotwork.m” and calls the Matlab function “work.m”, which does the actual calculations. These files have been tested in Matlab version 2012b. The surface deformation data are available upon request.
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