10 documents found in 464ms
# 1
Reiter, Karsten • Kukowski, Nina • Ratschbacher, Lothar • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This data publication includes animations and figures of eight scaled analogue models that are used to investigate the evolution of a curved mountain belt akin to the Pamir and Hindu Kush orogenic system and adjacent Tadjik basin. Crustal deformation is simulated by means of indentation of two basement blocks into a sedimentary sequence and the formation of a curved fold-and-thrust belt.The experimental set-up has two adjacent rigid indenters representing the basement blocks moving in parallel with a velocity difference (Figure 1). The slow indenter moves with a relative velocity ranging from 40 to 80% of that of the fast one. A layer of quartz sand in front of the indenters, 1 by 1 meter in size and 1.5 cm thick, represents the sedimentary basin infill. A basal detachment layer is made up of low-friction glass beads or viscous silicone oil representing weak shale or evaporates layers, respectively. The surface evolution by means of topography and strain distribution is derived from 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). This allows visualizing and analysing the development of the model surface during the complete model run at high spatio-temporal resolution. All details about the model set-up, modelling results and interpretation can be found in Reiter et al. (2011).The here provided additional material includes time-lapse movies showing the topographic evolution of the eight models. These visualizations are oblique views played back at 60-fold velocity for the “glass beads experiments” (gb40 to gb80) and 3600-fold velocity for the “silicone experiments” (si60, si-gb60).In addition to the experiment movies we provide a set of figures. The figures include surface views as well as cross-sections through the finite models highlighting the link between topography and internal structure of the simulated curved fold-and-thrust belts. Additionally, attribute maps of distinct morphometric measures (curvature, slope) and deformation parameters (uplift, horizontal translation) for the experiments with glass beads detachments are given. Finally, the movie “Experimenting.avi” shows in time-lapse the whole workflow of setting up, conducting and documenting an experiment, which originally required three days (for experiment si-gb60).An overview on the parameters used in the experimental series of the movie sequences is given in the explanatory file (Explanations_Reiter-et-al-2016.pdf). A full list of files is given in “list-of-files-Reiter-et-al-2016.pdf”.
# 2
Klinkmüller, Matthias • Schreurs, Guido • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This dataset provides sieve data (grain size distributions) on natural and artificial granular materials used for experimental simulation by the analogue geodynamic modelling community (21 sands and glass beads). The material samples have been collected community-wide and analysed at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the GeoMod2008 conference benchmark initiative. The context of data collection, details of the material samples and measuring techniques as well as interpretation and discussion of results can be found in Klinkmüller et al. (2016) to which this dataset is supplement material.
The data presented here are derived by sieving using a RETSCH Vibratory Sieve Shaker AS 200 basic at GFZ Potsdam’s analogue laboratory for tectonic modelling. Mesh sizes used were 630, 400, 355, 224, 125, and 63 micrometer. 1 kg of each sample material has been sieved for 4 hours at maximum Amplitude (3 mm). Laboratory conditions were air conditioned during all the measurements (Temperature: 23°C, Humidity: 45%).The resulting sieve analysis data are presented as fractions of 1 kg.
An overview of all files of the data set is given in the table SieveDataOverview.
# 3
Rosenau, Matthias • Corbi, Fabio • Dominguez, Stephane • Rudolf, Michael • Ritter, Malte • (et. al.)
Abstract: This data set contains various data derived from rock and rock analogue testing and analogue models which are presented in Rosenau et al. (2016) to which these data are supplement to..A first group of data contains animations of complementary analogue and numerical models of subduction zone earthquake cycles (A). A second group comprises analogue earthquake data and time series of surface deformation derived from scale models of subduction zone earthquake cycles (B). A third group consist of time series of stick-slip experiments using a ring shear tester (C). Finally, friction data both from rocks and rock analogue materials (D) as well as elasticity data from rock analogues are presented (E).See the Description of data and the List of files in the Data Download section for additional data description.
# 4
Heidbach, Oliver • Rajabi, Mojtaba • Reiter, Karsten • Ziegler, Moritz • WSM Team
Abstract: The World Stress Map (WSM) database is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale. The WSM database release 2016 contains 42,870 data records within the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust. The data are provided in three formats: Excel-file (wsm2016.xlsx), comma separated fields (wsm2016.csv) and with a zipped google Earth input file (wsm2016_google.zip). Data records with reliable A-C quality are displayed in the World Stress Map (doi:10.5880/WSM.2016.002). Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at www.world-stress-map.org.
# 5
Ziegler, Moritz • Rajabi, Mojtaba • Hersir, Gylfi • Ágústsson, Kristján • Árnadóttir, Sigurveig • (et. al.)
Abstract: The stress map of Iceland shows the orientation of the current maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) in the earth's crust. Assuming that the vertical stress (SV) is a principal stress, SHmax defines the orientation of the 3D stress tensor; the minimum horizontal stress Shmin is than perpendicular to SHmax. In the stress map the SHmax orientations are represented as lines of different lengths. The length of the line is a measure of the quality of data and the symbol shows the stress indicator and the color the stress regime. Data with E-Quality are shown without additional information as dots on the map. The stress data are freely available and part of the World Stress Map (WSM) project. For more information about the data and criteria of data analysis and quality mapping are plotted along the WSM website at http://www.world-stress-map.org.
The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale.
# 6
Heidbach, Oliver • Custodio, Susana • Kingdon, Andrew • Mariucci, Maria Theresa • Montone, Paola • (et. al.)
Abstract: The Stress Map of the Mediterranean and Central Europe 2016 displays 5011 A-C quality stress data records of the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust from the WSM database release 2016 (Heidbach et al, 2016, http://doi.org/10.5880/WSM.2016.001). Focal mechanism solutions determined as being potentially unreliable (labelled as Possible Plate Boundary Events in the database) are not displayed. Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at www.world-stress-map.org.
The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale.
# 7
Richter, Nicole • Favalli, Massimiliano • de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen, Elske • Fornaciai, Alessandro • da Silva Fernandes, Rui Manuel • (et. al.)
Abstract: We provide an updated lava flow hazard map for Fogo Volcano, Cabo Verde that is valid after the 2014-2015 eruptive crises. The hazard map shows the probability of lava flow invasion within the Chã das Caldeiras and on the eastern flank of the volcano. This probability is defined as the likelihood that a future lava flow will inundate a specific point before the vent location is known. The hazard map is calculated on the basis of a 5 m resolution digital elevation model generated from contours on the base of photogrammetric data that was updated for the 2014-2015 lava flow using combined terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) and camera data. The lava flow hazard map in printable A0 poster format is available in two versions, an English-Kreolu version (blue) and an English-Portugese version (green). Please refer to Richter et al. (2016) for more information and scientific background, as well as for supplementary material in kml format.
# 8
Reiter, Karsten • Heidbach, Oliver • Müller, Birgit • Reinecker, John • Röckel, Thomas
Abstract: The stress map of Germany shows the orientation of the current maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) in the earth's crust. Assuming that the vertical stress (SV) is a principal stress, SHmax defines the orientation of the 3D stress tensor; the minimum horizontal stress Shmin is than perpendicular to SHmax. In the stress map the SHmax orientations are represented as lines of different lengths. The length of the line is a measure of the quality of data and the symbol shows the stress indicator and the color the stress regime. Data with E-Quality are shown without additional information as dots on the map. The stress data are freely available and part of the World Stress Map (WSM) project. For more information about the data and criteria of data analysis and quality mapping are plotted along the WSM website at http://www.world-stress-map.org.The German version of the World Stress Map Germany is available via http://doi.org/10.5880/WSM.Germany2016.
The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale.
# 9
Reiter, Karsten • Heidbach, Oliver • Müller, Birgit • Reinecker, John • Röckel, Thomas
Abstract: Die Spannungskarte Deutschland zeigt die Orientierung der gegenwärtigen maximalen horizontalen Spannung (SHmax) in der Erdkruste. Unter der Annahme, dass die vertikale Spannung (SV) eine Hauptspannung ist, legt SHmax die Orientierung des 3D Spannungstensors festgelegt; die minimale horizontale Spannung Shmin ist entsprechend senkrecht zu SHmax. In der Spannungskarte sind die SHmax Orientierungen als Linien unterschiedlicher Länge dargestellt. Die Länge der Linie ist dabei ein Maß für die Datenqualität und das Symbol zeigt die Methode und die Farbe das Spannungsregime an. Daten mit E-Qualität sind ohne weitere Information als Punkte in der Karte dargestellt. Die Spannungsdaten sind frei zugänglich und Bestandteil des World Stress Map (WSM) Projektes. Weitere Informationen zu den Daten und Kriterien der Datenanalyse und Qualitätszuordnung befinden sich auf der WSM Internetseite unter http://www.world-stress-map.org. The English version of the World Stress Map Germany is available via http://doi.org/10.5880/WSM.Germany2016_en.
# 10
Heidbach, Oliver • Rajabi, Mojtaba • Reiter, Karsten • Ziegler, Moritz
Abstract: The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the crustal present-day stress field. It is a collaborative project between academia and industry that aims to characterize the stress pattern and to understand the stress sources. It commenced in 1986 as a project of the International Lithosphere Program under the leadership of Mary-Lou Zoback. From 1995-2008 it was a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities headed first by Karl Fuchs and then by Friedemann Wenzel. Since 2009 the WSM is maintained at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and since 2012 the WSM is a member of the ICSU World Data System. All stress information is analysed and compiled in a standardized format and quality-ranked for reliability and comparability on a global scale. The stress map displays A-C quality stress data records of the upper 40 km of the Earth’s crust from the WSM database release 2016 (doi:10.5880/WSM.2016.001). Focal mechanism solutions determined as being potentially unreliable (labelled as Possible Plate Boundary Events in the database) are not displayed. Further detailed information on the WSM quality ranking scheme, guidelines for the various stress indicators, and software for stress map generation and the stress pattern analysis is available at http://www.world-stress-map.org.
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