92 documents found in 498ms
# 1
Vey, Sibylle • Güntner, Andreas • Wickert, Jens • Blume, Theresa • Thoss, Heiko • (et. al.)
Abstract: We provide data of a case study from the GNSS station Wettzell, Germany (WTZR). This data set contains snow depth derived from GNSS data using reflectometry. It covers a time period from July 1, 2012 to July 1, 2015 and gives the integral snow depth over an area of about 150 by 30 m. The data are daily averages based on daily measurements from 4 different satellites. The GNSS derived snow depth was validated by observations from ultrasonic sensors (US). The detailed description of the processing, the evaluation with US and the discussion of the results is described in Vey et al. (2016). The data are provided in ASCII format with four colums: GNSS data (file Vey-et-al-2016-GNSS_2012_15.txt): (1) year (YEAR) (2) day of the year (DOY) (3) snow depth (SD cm) from GNSS (4) accuracy, root mean square error (RMSE cm) Ultrasonic Sensor data (file Vey-et-al-2016-US_2012_15..txt): (1) year (YEAR) (2) day of the year (DOY) (3) SD_US_pillow (cm) snow depth from the US sensor located above snow pillow (4) SD_US_SPA(cm) snow depth from the US sensor located at the snow pack analyzer
# 2
Lange, Stefan
Abstract: The EWEMBI dataset was compiled to support the bias correction of climate input data for the impact assessments carried out in phase 2b of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP2b; Frieler et al., 2017), which will contribute to the 2018 IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways. The EWEMBI data cover the entire globe at 0.5° horizontal and daily temporal resolution from 1979 to 2013. Data sources of EWEMBI are ERA-Interim reanalysis data (ERAI; Dee et al., 2011), WATCH forcing data methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis data (WFDEI; Weedon et al., 2014), eartH2Observe forcing data (E2OBS; Calton et al., 2016) and NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget data (SRB; Stackhouse Jr. et al., 2011). The SRB data were used to bias-correct E2OBS shortwave and longwave radiation (Lange, 2018). Variables included in the EWEMBI dataset are Near Surface Relative Humidity, Near Surface Specific Humidity, Precipitation, Snowfall Flux, Surface Air Pressure, Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation, Surface Downwelling Shortwave Radiation, Near Surface Wind Speed, Near-Surface Air Temperature, Daily Maximum Near Surface Air Temperature, Daily Minimum Near Surface Air Temperature, Eastward Near-Surface Wind and Northward Near-Surface Wind. For data sources, units and short names of all variables see Frieler et al. (2017, Table 1).
# 3
Rudenko, Sergei • Schöne, Tilo • Neumayer, Karl-Hans • Esselborn, Saskia • Raimondo, Jean-Claude • (et. al.)
Abstract: The data set provides GFZ VER11 orbits of altimetry satellites ERS-1 (August 1, 1991 - July 5, 1996),ERS-2 (May 13, 1995 - February 27, 2006),Envisat (April 12, 2002 - April 8, 2012),Jason-1 (January 13, 2002 - July 5, 2013) andJason-2 (July 5, 2008 - April 5, 2015)TOPEX/Poseidon (September 23, 1992 - October 8, 2005), derived at the time spans given at Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences within the Sea Level phase 2 project of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative using "Earth Parameter and Orbit System - Orbit Computation (EPOS-OC)" software and the Altimeter Database and processing System (ADS, http://adsc.gfz-potsdam.de/ads/) developed at GFZ. The orbits were computed in the same (ITRF2008) terrestrial reference frame for all satellites using common, most precise models and standards available and described below. The ERS-1 orbit is computed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) and altimeter crossover data, while the ERS-2 orbit is derived using additionally Precise Range And Range-rate Equipment (PRARE) measurements. The Envisat, TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 orbits are based on Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) and SLR observations. The orbit files are available in the Extended Standard Product 3 Orbit Format (SP3-c, ftp://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov/igscb/data/format/sp3c.txt) Files are gzip-compressed. File names are given as sate_YYYYMMDD_SP3C.gz, where "sate" is the abbreviation (ENVI, ERS1, ERS2, JAS1, JAS2, TOPX) of the satellite name, YYYY stands for 4-digit year, MM stands for month and DD stands for day of the beginning of the file. More details on these orbits are provided in Rudenko et al. (2017)
# 4
Förste, Christoph • Bruinsma, Sean • Abrikosov, Oleh • Rudenko, Sergiy • Lemoine, Jean-Michel • (et. al.)
Abstract: EIGEN-6S4 (Version 2) is a satellite-only global gravity field model from the combination of LAGEOS, GRACE and GOCE data. All spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree/order 80 are time variable. Their time variable parameters consist of drifts as well as annual and semi-annual variations per year. The time series of the time variable spherical harmonic coefficients are based on the LAGEOS-1/2 solution (1985 to 2003) and the GRACE-LAGEOS monthly gravity fields RL03-v2 (August 2002 to July 2014) from GRGS/Toulouse (Bruinsma et al. 2009). The herein included GRACE/LAGEOS data were combined with all GOCE data which have been processed via the direct numerical approach (Pail et al. 2011). The polar gap instabilty has been overcome using the Sperical Cap Regularization (Metzler and Pail 2005). That means this model is a combination of LAGEOS/GACE with GO_CONS_GCF_2_DIR_R5 (Bruinsma et al. 2013). Version History: This data set is an updated version of Foerste et al. (2016, http://doi.org/10.5880/icgem.2016.004) Compared to the first version, EIGEN-6S4v2 contains an improved modelling of the time variable part, in particular for C20.
# 5
Reiter, Karsten • Kukowski, Nina • Ratschbacher, Lothar • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This data publication includes animations and figures of eight scaled analogue models that are used to investigate the evolution of a curved mountain belt akin to the Pamir and Hindu Kush orogenic system and adjacent Tadjik basin. Crustal deformation is simulated by means of indentation of two basement blocks into a sedimentary sequence and the formation of a curved fold-and-thrust belt.The experimental set-up has two adjacent rigid indenters representing the basement blocks moving in parallel with a velocity difference (Figure 1). The slow indenter moves with a relative velocity ranging from 40 to 80% of that of the fast one. A layer of quartz sand in front of the indenters, 1 by 1 meter in size and 1.5 cm thick, represents the sedimentary basin infill. A basal detachment layer is made up of low-friction glass beads or viscous silicone oil representing weak shale or evaporates layers, respectively. The surface evolution by means of topography and strain distribution is derived from 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). This allows visualizing and analysing the development of the model surface during the complete model run at high spatio-temporal resolution. All details about the model set-up, modelling results and interpretation can be found in Reiter et al. (2011).The here provided additional material includes time-lapse movies showing the topographic evolution of the eight models. These visualizations are oblique views played back at 60-fold velocity for the “glass beads experiments” (gb40 to gb80) and 3600-fold velocity for the “silicone experiments” (si60, si-gb60).In addition to the experiment movies we provide a set of figures. The figures include surface views as well as cross-sections through the finite models highlighting the link between topography and internal structure of the simulated curved fold-and-thrust belts. Additionally, attribute maps of distinct morphometric measures (curvature, slope) and deformation parameters (uplift, horizontal translation) for the experiments with glass beads detachments are given. Finally, the movie “Experimenting.avi” shows in time-lapse the whole workflow of setting up, conducting and documenting an experiment, which originally required three days (for experiment si-gb60).An overview on the parameters used in the experimental series of the movie sequences is given in the explanatory file (Explanations_Reiter-et-al-2016.pdf). A full list of files is given in “list-of-files-Reiter-et-al-2016.pdf”.
# 6
Rudolf, Michael • Boutelier, David • Rosenau, Matthias • Schreurs, Guido • Oncken, Onno
Abstract: The datasets that are presented here have been obtained to provide a rheological benchmark of silicones used in various analog modeling laboratories. The data contains rheological measurements of several polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) and filled silicone oils. The samples of eight different silicone oils originate from seven laboratories. Each sample was analyzed using rotational controlled shear rate tests (CSR), temperature sweep test, and dynamical oscillation tests (amplitude and frequency sweeps). Detailed information on the analysis and interpretation of the data is found in Rudolf, et al. (2016).The data is provided as comma-separated files in *.csv format. Each file contains multiple measurements, each starting with own data series information that is followed by the actual measurement in the form of a table including the individual units of measure. Furthermore the results from ReSpect (Takeh & Shanbhag, 2013) for the discrete Maxwell relaxation spectra are provided. All files can be opened using a text-editor, MS Excel, or equivalent software.More information about the datasets is available in the file Explanations_Rudolf-et-al-2016.pdf, an overview on the available files in the List_of_Files_Rudolf-et-al-2016 (in .pdf and .xlsx format). All information and overview files are also included in Rudolf-et-al-2016_datasets.zip.
# 7
Klinkmüller, Matthias • Schreurs, Guido • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This dataset provides compaction data from axial testing on natural and artificial granular materials used for experimental simulation by the analogue geodynamic modelling community (21 sands and glass beads). The material samples have been collected community-wide and analysed at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the GeoMod2008 conference benchmark initiative. The context of data collection, details of the material samples and measuring techniques as well as interpretation and discussion of results can be found in Klinkmüller et al. (2016) to which this dataset is supplement material.
The data presented here are derived by uniaxial, confined compression testing using the Axial Tester at GFZ Potsdam’s analogue laboratory for tectonic modelling . Each sample has been carefully prepared by the same person and measured consistently following the same protocol. Preparation included sieving at 250 ml/min from 30 cm height into the container (jar). Up to 2000 kPa of uniaxial compression has been applied in 50 cycles. Laboratory conditions were air conditioned during all the measurements (Temperature: 23°C, Humidity: 45%).The resulting stress curve data are presented at 20 Hz frequency and the Unit of N. From the stress curves the compaction data have been derived. These correspond to the normalized sample height (normalized to the initial height) of the sample at the beginning of each cycle and are characterized by an exponential decrease over the 50 cycles. From that the following compaction parameters are derived: total compaction (shortening after 50 cycles Ct=eps50), the compaction during the first cycle (eps1) as well as the compaction index (Ci = eps1/eps50). Compaction data are finally visualized in the compactionDataPlot file.Each material sample has a relation to three files: stress curve data (txt format, 50 files per sample), compaction data (in xls and txt format), compaction plot (pdf format), examples of which are shown below. An overview of all files of the data set is given in the table CompactionDataOverview.xls.
# 8
Klinkmüller, Matthias • Kemnitz, Helga • Schreurs, Guido • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This dataset provides images from scanning electron microscope (SEM) photography of natural and artificial granular materials used for experimental simulation by the analogue geodynamic modelling community (21 sands and glass beads). The material samples have been collected community-wide and analysed at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the GeoMod2008 conference benchmark initiative. The context of data collection, details of the material samples and measuring techniques as well as interpretation and discussion of results can be found in Klinkmüller et al. (2016) to which this dataset is supplement material.
The data presented here are derived by using the scanning electron microscope facility at GFZ Potsdam. The selected grains were mounted on aluminium stubs supplied with conductive carbon tabs and gold-palladium coated. The study was performed using a ZEISS DSM 692 (in 2008) and (in 2009) a ZEISS ULTRA 55 Plus Schottky-type field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) at acceleration voltages from 7 to 20 kV. In both cases, we used the secondary (SE) electron signals providing the best spatial resolution of the sample morphology.The resulting SEM images are presented. From each sample several magnifications are provided ranging from overview (50x-100x) to particle portraits (100x-500x) and, for glass beads, to surface landscapes (500x-10.000x).
An overview of all files of the data set is given in the table SEMDataOverview.
# 9
Klinkmüller, Matthias • Schreurs, Guido • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This dataset provides sieve data (grain size distributions) on natural and artificial granular materials used for experimental simulation by the analogue geodynamic modelling community (21 sands and glass beads). The material samples have been collected community-wide and analysed at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the GeoMod2008 conference benchmark initiative. The context of data collection, details of the material samples and measuring techniques as well as interpretation and discussion of results can be found in Klinkmüller et al. (2016) to which this dataset is supplement material.
The data presented here are derived by sieving using a RETSCH Vibratory Sieve Shaker AS 200 basic at GFZ Potsdam’s analogue laboratory for tectonic modelling. Mesh sizes used were 630, 400, 355, 224, 125, and 63 micrometer. 1 kg of each sample material has been sieved for 4 hours at maximum Amplitude (3 mm). Laboratory conditions were air conditioned during all the measurements (Temperature: 23°C, Humidity: 45%).The resulting sieve analysis data are presented as fractions of 1 kg.
An overview of all files of the data set is given in the table SieveDataOverview.
# 10
Klinkmüller, Matthias • Schreurs, Guido • Rosenau, Matthias
Abstract: This dataset provides friction data from ring shear test (RST) on natural and artificial granular materials used for experimental simulation by the analogue geodynamic modelling community (21 sands and glass beads). The material samples have been collected community-wide and analysed at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the GeoMod2008 conference benchmark initiative. The context of data collection, details of the material samples and measuring techniques as well as interpretation and discussion of results can be found in Klinkmüller et al. (2016) to which this dataset is supplement material.
The data presented here are derived by ring shear testing using a SCHULZE RST-01.pc (Schulze, 1994) at GFZ Potsdam’s analogue laboratory for tectonic modelling. Each sample has been carefully prepared by the same person and measured consistently following the same protocol. Preparation included sieving at 250 ml/min from 30 cm height into the shear cell. Measurements have been done at normal loads (normal stress) of 430, 860, 1290, 1720, and 2150 Pa and shear velocity of 3 mm/min typical of experimental conditions. Laboratory conditions were air conditioned during all the measurements (Temperature: 23°C, Humidity: 45%). The measurements presented here correspond to internal friction, shearing inside the material. Data for so-called basal or wall friction, i.e. shearing against a fixed plate, are available on request.The resulting shear stress curves are presented at 5 Hz frequency and the Unit of Pa. From the shear stress curves the friction data, i.e. peak, dynamic and reactivation friction, have been picked manually and are presented as data pairs (normal stress & respective shear strength). Matlab-based regression analysis of these friction data by means of (a) multilinear regression of all data pairs and (b) mutual regression of two data pairs constrains the material shear failure envelope characterized by friction coefficient (slope of regression line) and cohesion (y-axis intercept of regression line). The results are presented by friction plots.
Each material sample corresponds to three files: shear stress curves (xls/txt format), friction data (txt format), friction plots (pdf format), examples of which are shown below. An overview of all files of the data set is given in the table RSTDataOverview.
Cited reference: Schulze, D. (1994), Entwicklung und Anwendung eines neuartigen Ringschergerätes. Aufbereitungstechnik 35 (10), 524-535.
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