15 documents found in 242ms
# 1
Willmes, Christian • Yener, Yasa • Gilgenberg, Anton • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: The Collaborative Research Centre 806 database (CRC806-Database, http://crc806db.uni-koeln.de) is online and operating since 2011. The architecture consists of a Typo3 based website frontend, a CKAN based metadata storage and an OGC compliant Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). It was decided to update the system with some major changes to the overall architecture, by preserving the current API functionality and the URLs of the datasets in the database. This paper describes the system architecture of the partly new implementation of the CRC806-Database. The SDI part of the system is migrated from the current MapServer, GeoServer, MapProxy and pyCSW based implementation to a GeoNode based system. Additionally the Typo3 based frontend of the web portal is changed to use mostly server side Extbase and Fluid based content handling and rendering, instead of the current AgularJS based frontend. Due to stability and consistency difficulties of client side rendering we decided to build a more robust system and move to server side rendering. The reasons for migrating to GeoNode for the SDI stack and away from JavaScript based client side to a server side rendering are discussed by taking into account pro and contra of both approaches, as well as a list of lessons learned from the ongoing development and operation of the CRC806-Database.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 115-126
# 2
Märker, Michael • Willmes, Christian • Hochschild, Volker • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: In the recent past database (DB) systems providing information on early humans and their environment are becoming more and more important and increase rapidly in number. However, this increase in different DB systems is concomitant with an increasing redundancy in the digital information stored in these database systems. Therefore, in this study we explore ways to reduce redundancies due to multiple storage of data and, hence, we show solutions to minimize the requirements to store and manage digital information in the prehistory and paleoenvironment domains. The example is based on the database systems of the DFG financed SFB 806: ‘Our Way to Europe’ and the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities project entitled: ‘The Role Of Culture in Early Expansion of Humans’ (ROCEEH). We focus especially on the spatial data available in both systems as well as on the environmental information. Therefore, we examine and test exchange interfaces based on Spatial Data Infrastructure technology (OGC Standards) and metadata/schema mappings. The paper presents currently implemented interfaces of both database systems in terms of their main commonalities and differences. Based on this overview, we discuss ways of direct links between the DB systems. Moreover, we identify procedures that need to be developed in the future to integrate and exchange data between both systems. We show that DB-linking activities based on the OGC standards yield valuable results and lead to a more efficient, sustainable management of these DB systems providing added values for the related research groups.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 55-61
# 3
Curdt, Constanze • Lang, Ulrich • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: This paper introduces the CRC/TR32 database (TR32DB), a research data management system developed within the multidisciplinary research project Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 (CRC/TR32) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The aim of the TR32DB is to support collative research within the whole project by providing data storage, backup, archive, documentation, publication and also sharing services. The entire system is self-developed according to the requirements of the funding agency, the user and project demands, as well as according to recent principles and standards. The TR32DB system architecture is basically a combination of data storage (file management), database and web-interface. In addition, the TR32DB Metadata Schema was designed and implemented to describe all project data with accurate metadata. A user-friendly multi-level approach was chosen to cover the requirements of all data stored in the TR32DB with appropriate metadata.
Proceedings of the 2nd Data Management Workshop, 28.-29.11.2014, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 96, pp. 7-15
# 4
Bareth, Georg • Aasen, Helge • Bendig, Juliane • Gnyp, Martin Leon • Bolten, Andreas • (et. al.)
Abstract: The non-destructive monitoring of crop growth status with field-based or tractor-based multi- or hyperspectral sensors is a common practice in precision agriculture. The demand for flexible, easy to use, and field scale systems in super-high resolution (<20 cm) or on single plant scale is given to provide in-field variability of crop growth status for management purposes. Satellite and airborne systems are usually not able to provide the spatial and temporal resolution for such purposes within a low-cost approach. The developments in the area of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) seem to fill exactly that niche. In this contribution, we introduce two hyperspectral frame cameras weighing less than 1 kg which can be mounted to low-weight UAVs (<3 kg). The first results of a campaign in June 2013 are presented and the derived spectra from the hyperspectral images are compared to related spectra collected with a portable spectroradiometer. The results are promising.
# 5
Bendig, Juliane • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: The workshop on UAV-based Remote Sensing Methods for Monitoring Vegetation took place at the University of Cologne in September 2013 and was organized within the activities of the ISPRS Working Group VII/5 “Methods for Change Detection and Process Modelling” of the ISPRS Technical Commission VII “Thematic Processing, Modelling, and Analysis of Remotely Sensed Data”. The Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Plant Sciences (IBG-2), of the Forschungszentrum Jülich as well as the following research projects supported and co-organized the workshop: The two Collaborative Research Centres, the CRC/TR32 “Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation” and the CRC806 “Our way to Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary” which are funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The CROP.SENSe.net research network which analyses plant phenotypes to enhance efficiency in crop breeding and decision making in crop management. The project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and by the Ziel 2-Programm NRW 2007–2013 “Regionale Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und Beschäftigung (EFRE)” by the Ministry for Innovation, Science and Research (MIWF) of the state North Rhine Westphalia (NRW) and European Union Funds for regional development (EFRE) (005-1103-0018). The International Center for Agro-Informatics and Sustainable Development (ICASD), which is a cooperation of the China Agricultural University and the University of Cologne. The publication of the Special Issue "UAV-Based Remote Sensing Methods for Modeling, Mapping, and Monitoring Vegetation and Agricultural Crops" of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292) and the Special Issue on "Spatial Data Acquisition, Handling, and Analysis in Agro-Geoinformatics" of the ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964) emerged in the context of this workshop.
# 6
Yu, Kang • Gnyp, Martin Leon • Gao, L. • Miao, Yuxin • Chen, Xinping • (et. al.)
Abstract: Nitrogen (N) is one of the most essential elements in agriculture and ecology due to its direct role in determining crop yield and grain quality, as well as its association with canopy photosynthetic capacity and carbon-nitrogen cycling in the earth ecosystem. Remote sensing provides a useful way to capture canopy nitrogen and biomass with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, seasonal dynamics of plant morphophysiological variation hinder the simultaneous estimation of canopy N concentration (%N) and biomass using a traditional method such as vegetation indices because of the distinct dynamics of canopy biochemical and physical traits. In contrast, multivariate analysis method offers the capability of calibrating a model with multiple dependent variables of interest. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to, simultaneously, estimate canopy %N and biomass of rice using the partial least squares regression (PLSR) model. A field experiment was conducted for paddy rice fertilized with five N rates across five growth stages in 2008, located in the Sanjiang Plain, China. Results showed that the PLS regression model simultaneously explained 84% and 91% of the variation in %N and biomass, respectively, across the five growth stages. Our results also suggest that biomass is the dominant factor that affects the link between canopy dynamical traits and canopy reflectance measures. This study demonstrates that, by incorporating with PLSR for retrieving biophysical and biochemical properties from the full-spectrum analysis, to what extent canopy %N and biomass can be simultaneously estimated from canopy reflectance measurement.
# 7
Gnyp, Martin Leon • Miao, Yuxin • Yuan, Fei • Yu, Kang • Yao, Yinkun • (et. al.)
Abstract: Aboveground biomass (AGB) plays an important role in agriculture for assessing the production of foods, forage and renewable energy. Hyperspectral field measurements are an efficient method for nondestructive monitoring of AGB. Recent studies have confirmed the benefit of using different types of reflectance such as raw reflectance and its derivatives in the non-destructive methods. The objective of this study was to improve the estimation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) AGB with Optimum Multiple Narrow Band Reflectance (OMNBR) models based on raw reflectance (RR) and its first derivative of reflectance (FDR). Experiments with different nitrogen rates were conducted in experimental and farmers fields from 2007 through 2009 in Jiansanjiang, Northeast China. Hyperspectral data and AGB were collected at two growth stages - tillering and stem elongation. OMNBR models with 1-4 bands based on RR and FDR were performed. The results indicated that FDR-based OMNBR models were more accurate than RR-based ones, with the highest improvement found in FDR-based 1-2 band models. At the tillering stage, red and near infrared bands were selected, while the near infrared and shortwave infrared bands were applied at the stem elongation stage. Across both stages, FDR-based OMNBR models performed better than RR-based OMNBR models. These findings imply that derivative analysis may help to reduce the background influence of soil and water as well as the effects of illumination variations at early growth stages. More studies are needed to further explore the potential of derivative analysis.
# 8
Tilly, Nora • Hoffmeister, Dirk • Aasen, Helge • Brands, Jonas • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: Research in the field of precision agriculture is becoming increasingly important due to the growing world population whilst area for cultivation remains constant or declines. In this context, methods of monitoring in?season plant development with high resolution and accuracy are necessary. Studies show that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to capture small objects like crops. In this contribution, the results of multi-temporal field campaigns with the terrestrial laser scanner Riegl LMS-Z420i are shown. Four surveys were carried out in the growing period 2012 on a field experiment where various barley varieties were cultivated in small-scale plots. In order to measure the plant height above ground, the TLS-derived point clouds are interpolated to generate Crop Surface Models with a very high resolution of 1 cm. For all campaigns, a common reference surface, representing the Digital Elevation Model was used to monitor plant height in the investigated period. Manual plant height measurements were carried out to verify the results. The very high coefficients of determination (R² = 0.89) between both measurement methods show the applicability of the approach presented. Furthermore, destructive biomass sampling was performed to investigate the relation to plant height. Biomass is an important parameter for evaluating the actual crop status, but non-destructive methods of directly measuring crop biomass do not exist. Hence, other parameters like reflectance are considered. The focus of this study is on non-destructive measurements of plant height. The high coefficients of determination between plant height and fresh as well as dry biomass (R² = 0.80, R² = 0.77) support the usability of plant height as a predictor. The study presented here demonstrates the applicability of TLS in monitoring plant height development with a very high spatial resolution.
# 9
Lenz-Wiedemann, Victoria • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: From 18th - 19th of November, 2010, the 'Workshop on Remote Sensing Methods for Change Detection and Process modelling' was held at the University of Cologne, Germany. This workshop was organized by the Working Group 5 'Methods for Change Detection and Process Modelling' within the Commission VII 'Thematic Processing, Modelling and Analysis or Remotely Sensed Data' of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS). Three research projects actively supported the workshop. The CRC/TR32 'Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation' as well as the CRC 806 'Our way to Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Later Quaternary', both Collaborative Research Centres of the German Research Foundation (DFG). Within the CROP.SENSe.net (funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, BMBF), sensor methods for monitoring crops are investigated. Finally, the workshop was supported by the International Centre for Agro-Informatics and Sustainable Development (ICASD), which was founded in cooperation with the China Agricultural University and the u CROP.SENSe.net University of Cologne. The goal of the workshop was to bring together scientific disciplines as disparate as geography, soil sciences, plant physiology, hydrology, meteorology, prehistory, archaeology, agronomy, remote sensing, and geoinformatics. The workshop was based on 14 invited talks and unusual long coffee breaks, parallel to poster sessions to encourage and support discussion. The diverse program attracted nearly 40 poster presentations and approximately 90 participants. The papers and abstracts of the workshop are summarized in the workshop proceedings.
Proceedings on the Workshop of Remote Sensing Methods for Change Detection and Process Modelling, 18-19 November 2010, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 92, pp. III
# 10
Curdt, Constanze • Bareth, Georg
Abstract: From 29th - 30th of October, 2009, the 'Data Management Workshop' was held at the University of Cologne, Germany. This workshop was actively supported by two research projects. The CRC/TR32 'Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation' as well as the CRC 806 'Our way to Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Later Quaternary', both Collaborative Research Centres of the German Research Foundation (DFG). In addition the workshop was co-organized by the Working Group 5 'Methods for Change Detection and Process Modelling' within the Commission VII 'Thematic Processing, Modelling and Analysis or Remotely Sensed Data' of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS). Since many different scientific communities are facing similar problems in data handling, the aim of the workshop was to bring together a variety of scientific disciplines, which are sometimes recognised as being quite incompatible with one other (e.g. computer sciences, social sciences, geography, physics, pre-history, geoinformatics, archaeology, geosciences, meteorology, and biology). Moreover, the goal was to take into account the perspective of the funding bodies, in our case the DFG. The workshop was based on 11 invited talks and unusual long coffee breaks, parallel to poster sessions to encourage and support discussion. The diverse program attracted nearly 30 poster presentations and approximately 80 participants. The papers and abstracts of the workshop are summarized in the workshop proceedings.
Proceedings of the Data Management Workshop, 29-30 October 2009, University of Cologne, Germany, Kölner Geographische Arbeiten, 90, pp. III-IV
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