163 documents found in 266ms
# 131
Möller, Fabian • Liebscher, Axel • Martens, Sonja • Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia • Kühn, Michael
Abstract: The pilot site Ketzin is the longest-operating European onshore CO2 storage site and the only one in operation in Germany. Since the beginning of the storage activity at the end of June 2008, more than 56.000 tons of CO2 were successfully injected until December2011. CO2 is injected into a saline aquifer. It consists of 630 m to 650 m deep sandstone units of the Stuttgart Formation of Upper Triassic age. They were deposited in a fluvial environment. A sequence of about 165 m of overlaying mudstones and anhydrites is sealing the storage complex and act as a caprock. The research and development programme at Ketzin is among the most extensive worldwide in the context of geological CO2 storage. Research activities have produced a broad data base and knowledge concerning the storage complex at Ketzin as well as generic cognition This data publication compiles and reviews the operational data recorded at the Ketzin pilot site for 2008 (injection data: CO2 mass flow, temperatures, pressures, flow rate, etc.).
# 132
Vey, Sibylle • Güntner, Andreas • Wickert, Jens • Blume, Theresa • Ramatschi, Markus
Abstract: We provide data of a case study from the GNSS station Sutherland, South Africa (SUTM). This data set contains soil moisture derived from GNSS data using reflectometry. It covers a time period from January 1, 2008 to September 1, 2014 and gives the integral soil moisture over an area of 60 by 60 m for the uppermost surface (max. down to 10 cm. depth) The data are daily averages based on daily measurements from 6 different satellites. The GNSS derived soil moisture was validated by Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) observations. The detailed description of the processing, the evaluation with TDR and the discussion of the results is described in Vey et al. (2015).The data are provided in ASCII format with four colums: (1) year (YEAR) (2) day of the year (DOY) (3) volumetric soil moisture as average over all satellite tracks (SM Vol %) (4) accuracy, root mean square error of soil moisture from a single satellite track compared to the mean of all satellites (RMSE Vol %).
# 133
Boike, Julia • Elger, Kirsten • Brunke, Melanie • Hinzman, Larry D.
Abstract: Schematic overview of a typical terrestrial and shallow-marine permafrost landscape during summer and winter. Permafrost is defined as ground that remains continuously at or below 0°C for at least two consecutive years; some 24% of the land surface in the northern hemisphere is classified as permafrost. This schematic figure (summer) pictures a terrestrial and shallow marine permafrost system. A permafrost landscape is characterized by its large heterogeneity with morphological permafrost-related features such as polygonal patterned ground with underlying ice wedges, thaw ponds, thermokarst lakes, and wetland areas. During winter, the terrestrial landscape is covered with snow, and water bodies and the ocean are typically covered with ice.The last pictures shows schematically the fluxes (not scaled) that occur between the terrestrial and marine environment and atmosphere.
# 134
Ullah, Shahid • Abdrakhmatov, Kanat • Sadykova, Alla • Ibragimov, Roman • Ishuk, Anatoly • (et. al.)
Abstract: Area Source model for Central AsiaThe area sources for Central Asia within the EMCA model are defined by mainly considering the pattern of crustal seismicity down to 50 km depth. Although tectonic and geological information, such as the position and strike distribution of known faults, have also been taken into account when available. Large area sources (see, for example source_id 1, 2, 5, 45 and 52, source ids are identified by parameter “source_id” in the related shapefile) are defined where the seismicity is scarce and there are no tectonic or geological features that would justify a further subdivision. Smaller area sources (e.g., source_id values 36 and 53) have been designed where the seismicity can be assigned to known fault zones. In order to obtain a robust estimation of the necessary parameters for PSHA derived by the statistical analysis of the seismicity, due to the scarcity of data in some of the areas covered by the model, super zones are introduced. These super zones are defined by combining area sources based on similarities in their tectonic regime, and taking into account local expert’s judgments. The super zones are used to estimate: (1) the completeness time of the earthquake catalogue, (2) the depth distribution of seismicity, (3) the tectonic regime through focal mechanisms analysis, (4) the maximum magnitude and (5) the b values via the GR relationship.The earthquake catalogue for focal mechanism is extracted from the Harvard Global Centroid Moment Tensor Catalog (Ekström and Nettles, 2013). For the focal mechanism classification, the Boore et al. (1997) convention is used. This means that an event is considered to be strike-slip if the absolute value of the rake angle is <=30 or >=150 degrees, normal if the rake angle is <-30 or >-150 and reverse (thrust) if the rake angle is >30 or <150 degrees. The distribution of source mechanisms and their weights are estimated for the super zones. For area sources, the maximum magnitude is usually taken from the historical seismicity, but due to some uncertainties in the magnitudes of the largest events, the opinions of the local experts are also included in assigning the maximum magnitude to each super zone. Super zones 2 and 3, which belongs to stable regions, are each assigned a maximum magnitude of 6, after Mooney et al. (2012), which concludes after analyses and observation of modern datasets that at least an event of magnitude 6 can occur anywhere in the world. For hazard calculations, each area source is assigned the maximum magnitude of their respective super zone.For processing the GR parameters (a and b values) for the area sources, the completeness analysis results estimated for the super zones are assigned to the respective smaller area sources. If the individual area source has at least 20 events, the GR parameters are then estimated for the area source. Otherwise, the b value is adopted from the respective super zone to which the smaller area source belongs, and the a value is estimated based on the Weichert (1980) method. This ensures the stability in the b value as well as the variation of activity rate for different sources. The hypocentral depth distribution is estimated from the seismicity inside each super zone. The depth distribution is considered for maximum up to three values. Based on the number of events, the weights are assigned to each distribution. These depth distributions, along with corresponding weights, are further assigned to the area sources within the same super zones.
Distribution file: "EMCA_seismozonesv1.0_shp.zip"Version: v1.0Release date: 2015-07-30Format: ESRI ShapefileGeometry type: polygonsNumber of features: 63Spatial Reference System: +proj=longlat +ellps=WGS84 +datum=WGS84 +no_defs Distribution file: "EMCA_seismozonesv1.0_nrml.zip"Version: v1.0Release date: 2015-07-30Format: NRML (XML) Format compatible with the GEM OpenQuake platform (http://www.globalquakemodel.org/openquake/about/platform/) Feature attributes:src_id : Id of the seismic sourcesrc_name : Name of the seismic sourcetect_reg: Tectonic regime of the seismic sourceupp_seismo : Upper level of the the seismogenic depth (km)low_seismo : Lower level of the seismogenic depth (km)mag_scal_r: Magnitude scaling relationshiprup_asp_ra: Rupture aspect ratiomfd_type : Magnitude frequency distribution typemin_mag: Minimum magnitude of the magnitude frequency relationshipmax_mag: Maximum magnitude of the magnitude frequency relationshipa_value: a value of the magnitude frequency relationshipb_balue : b value of the magnitude frequency relationshipnum_npd: number of nodal plane distributionweight_1 : weight of 1st nodal plane distributionstrike_1: Strike of the seismic source (degrees)rake_1: rake of the seismic source (degrees)dip_1: dip of the seismic source (degrees)num_hdd: number of hypocentral depth distributionhdd_d_1: Depth of 1st hypocentral depth distribution (km)hdd_w_1: Weight of 1st hypocentral depth distribution
# 135
Mikhailova, Natalya • Poleshko, N.N. • Aristova, I.L. • Mukambayev, A.S. • Kulikova, G.O.
Abstract: The EMCA (Earthquake Model Central Asia) catalogue (Mikhailova et al., 2015) includes information for 33620 earthquakes that occurred in Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan). The catalogue provides for each event the estimated magnitude in terms of MLH (surface wave magnitude) scale, widely used in former USSR countries.MLH magnitudes range from 1.5 to 8.3. Although the catalogue spans the period from 2000 BC to 2009 AD, most of the entries (i.e. 33378) describe earthquakes that occurred after 1900. The catalogue includes the standard parametric information required for seismic hazard studies (i.e., time, location and magnitude values). The catalogue has been composed by integrating different sources (using different magnitude scales) and harmonised in terms of MLH scale. The MLH magnitude is determined from the horizontal component of surface waves (Rautian and Khalturin, 1994) and is reported in most of the seismic bulletins issued by seismological observatories in Central Asia. For the instrumental period MLH magnitude was estimated, when not directly measured, either from body wave magnitude (Mb), the energy class (K) or Mpva (regional magnitude by body waves determined by P-wave recorded by short-period instruments) using empirical regression analyses. The following relationships were used to estimate MLH (see Mikhailova, internal EMCA report, 2014):(1) MLH=0.47 K-1.15(2) MLH=1.34 Mb-1.89(3) MLH=1.14 Mpva-1.45When multiple scales were available for the same earthquake, priority was given to the conversion from K class. For the historical period, the MLH values were obtained from macroseismic information (Kondorskaya and Ulomov, 1996).
The catalogue is distributed as a ascii file in CSV (Comma Separated Value) format and UTF-8 encoding. A separate .csvt file is provided for column type specification (useful for importing the .csv file in QGIS and other similar environments).For each event the estimated location is provided as longitude, latitude, with the following spatial reference system: +proj=longlat +ellps=WGS84 +datum=WGS84 +no_defsWhen possible, precise indication of the events´ time in UTC format are provided.Distribution file: "EMCA_SeismoCat_v1.0.csv" Version: v1.0 Release date: 2015-07-30Header of CSV file:id: (int) serial ID of the eventyear: (int) Year of the event. Negative years refer to BCE (Before Common Era / Before Christ) eventsmonth: (int, 1-12) Month of the year for the eventday: (int, 1-31) Day of the month for the eventhour : (int, 0-23) Hour of the daymin: (int, 0-59) Minute of the hoursec: (int, 0-59) Second (and hundredth of second, if available) of the minutelat: (float) Latitude of the eventlon: (float) Longitude of the eventfdepth: (int) Focal depth of event in kmmlh: (float) Surface wave magnitude (see e.g. Rautian T. and V. Khalturin, 1994)
# 136
Rößler, Dirk • Passarelli, Luigi • Govoni, Aladino • Rivalta, Eleonora
Abstract: Phase A: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20100101_20120527_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20100101_20120527_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase A (01/01/2010 - 27/05/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase B: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20120528_20120731_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20120528_20120731_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase B (28/05/2012 - 31/07/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Small grey dots: events during the phase A. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase C: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20120801_20121024_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20120801_20121024_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase C (01/08/2012 - 24/10/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Small grey dots: events during the phases A, B. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase D: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121025_20121212_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121025_20121212_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase D (25/10/2012 - 12/12/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Small grey dots: events during the phases A, B,C. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase E: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121213_20121219_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121213_20121219_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase D (13/12/2012 - 19/12/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase F.1: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121220_20131231_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20121220_20131231_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase F.1 (20/12/2012 - 31/12/2012). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1]. Phase F.2: roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20140101_20140910_0_90.png roessler_pollino_locations_gfzpublication20140101_20140910_movie.avi Map with the locations of earthquake hypocentres during phase F.1 (01/01/2013 - 10/09/2014). The yellow star shows the location of the main M5.2 earthquake on 25 October 2012. Day 0 corresponds to the start of the Pollino Seismic experiment on 2 November 2012. The system of normal faults on the surface are redrawn from [1].
# 138
Grünthal, Gottfried • Wahlström, Rutger
Abstract: The EMEC earthquake catalogue is an extension in time and space of the CENEC catalogue (Grünthal et al., 2009, http://doi.org/10.1007/s10950-008-9144-9). It consists of some 45,000 entries in Europe and the Mediterranean area and extends to the west to encompass the North Atlantic Ridge. The criteria are Mw ≥ 3.5 for events with latitude ≥ 44°N and Mw ≥ 4.0 for events with latitude < 44°N, in the time period 1000-2006. Data within the catalogue area can be obtained as ASCII-file through the EMEC Earthquake Catalogue Web Service. This webservice also enables the creation of seismicity maps according to user's specifications. In addition, a list of earthquakes in the time period 300-999 for Mw ≥ 6.0 in the catalogue area with latitude ≤ 40°N and longitude ≥ 10°E is given and a list of fake events in the time period 1000-1799.
# 139
Ulbricht, Damian • Klump, Jens • Conze, Ronald
Abstract: Generating data catalogue pages from ISO19139, GMCD-DIF and Catacite metadata
# 140
Haas, Michael • Agnon, Amotz • Bindi, Dino • Parolai, Stefano • Pittore, Massimiliano
Abstract: This data publication includes the DESERVE Earthquake Catalogue of historical and recent earthquakes and the DESERVE Macroseismic Intensity Dataset. The DESERVE Earthquake Catalogue is a catalog of historical earthquakes in the region around the Dead Sea. It was compiled from several sources, including recent events (> Mw 3) for the region between 24.55° and 37.80° N and between 29.95° and 40.80° E. The catalogue includes events that occurred between the year 23 C.E. and 2014 C.E. and their magnitude was harmonized to moment magnitude. Details on how duplicates were removed, which magnitude conversions were applied, about the original data sources and the catalog completeness can be found in Haas et al. (2016). The DESERVE Macroseismic Intensity Data set consists of macroseismic intensity observations for historical earthquakes in the region around the Dead Sea. It was compiled from several sources, including seismic events (Mw 4.2 - 7.9) that occurred between the year 23 C.E. and 1995 C.E for the region between 23.78° and 41.01° N and between 24.81° and 50.16°. Details on the the original sources can be found in Haas et al. (2016). Both datasets are available in csv format and accompanied by explanatory files.
The Virtual Institute DEad SEa Research Venue DESERVE is a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ with well-established partners in the Dead Sea region. The region faces big natural challenges. Among them are sea level decline, desertification, flash floods, ascending brines polluting freshwater, sinkhole development, and the repeated occurrence of earthquakes. Climate change and extensive exploitation of groundwater and surface water even aggravate the situation. These challenges can be only mastered in an interdisciplinary research effort involving all neighbouring countries. DESERVE is offering the unique opportunity to integrate the scientific results already achieved or presently elaborated in the Dead Sea region into a joint scientific approach based on earth, water, and environmental sciences. DESERVE is aimed at studying coupled atmospheric, hydrological, and lithospheric processes, such as sinkholes, flash floods, and earthquakes. This interdisciplinary research approach will contribute to a sound scientific understanding of the ongoing processes. Furthermore, it enables the development of prediction models, remediation strategies, and risk assessments with respect to environmental risk, water availability, and climate change. DESERVE is funded by the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers.
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