73 documents found in 241ms
# 1
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 2
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 3
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 4
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 5
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 6
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 7
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The main objective of this drilling fluid analysis was the detection of inflows of formation fluids. Therefore different gases dissolved in the drilling mud were measured continuously and automatically at drill site with three different methodes (Fig.: KTB-Report 92-2 page C13). The operation principles of the mass spectrometer and the gaschromatograph have been explained by STROH et al. (1988) and FIGGEMEIER et al. (1991). The principle of radon determination is published by ERZINGER et al. (1992).
# 8
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The qualitative and quantitative phase analyses were performed in the KTB field laboratory by x-ray powder diffraction using SIEMENS D 500 diffractometer. During early stages of the KTB project a new method for quantitative phase analysis was developed (see references below). The method is based on the comparison of the diffraction spectrum of the unknown sample with those of pure minerals. The powder diffraction data of the minerals are stored in a database built up of 250 natural minerals separated from various types of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The complete analyses (radiation: Cu K alpha, lambda: 1,5405Å, stepwidth: 0,01°, counting time 2 sec/step, angle 2-80°) was carried out automatically including computations. The results of this quantitative phase analysis were used e.g. to check thin section petrography (and vice versa) and to construct a \"mineralogical rock composition log\".
# 9
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The qualitative and quantitative phase analyses were performed in the KTB field laboratory by x-ray powder diffraction using SIEMENS D 500 diffractometer. During early stages of the KTB project a new method for quantitative phase analysis was developed (see references below). The method is based on the comparison of the diffraction spectrum of the unknown sample with those of pure minerals. The powder diffraction data of the minerals are stored in a database built up of 250 natural minerals separated from various types of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The complete analyses (radiation: Cu K alpha, lambda: 1,5405Å, stepwidth: 0,01°, counting time 2 sec/step, angle 2-80°) was carried out automatically including computations. The results of this quantitative phase analysis were used e.g. to check thin section petrography (and vice versa) and to construct a \"mineralogical rock composition log\".
# 10
KTB, WG Geochemistry
Abstract: The qualitative and quantitative phase analyses were performed in the KTB field laboratory by x-ray powder diffraction using SIEMENS D 500 diffractometer. During early stages of the KTB project a new method for quantitative phase analysis was developed (see references below). The method is based on the comparison of the diffraction spectrum of the unknown sample with those of pure minerals. The powder diffraction data of the minerals are stored in a database built up of 250 natural minerals separated from various types of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The complete analyses (radiation: Cu K alpha, lambda: 1,5405Å, stepwidth: 0,01°, counting time 2 sec/step, angle 2-80°) was carried out automatically including computations. The results of this quantitative phase analysis were used e.g. to check thin section petrography (and vice versa) and to construct a \"mineralogical rock composition log\".
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