2 documents found in 86ms
# 1
Rudenko, Sergei • Schöne, Tilo • Neumayer, Karl-Hans • Esselborn, Saskia • Raimondo, Jean-Claude • (et. al.)
Abstract: The data set provides GFZ VER11 orbits of altimetry satellites ERS-1 (August 1, 1991 - July 5, 1996),ERS-2 (May 13, 1995 - February 27, 2006),Envisat (April 12, 2002 - April 8, 2012),Jason-1 (January 13, 2002 - July 5, 2013) andJason-2 (July 5, 2008 - April 5, 2015)TOPEX/Poseidon (September 23, 1992 - October 8, 2005), derived at the time spans given at Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences within the Sea Level phase 2 project of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative using "Earth Parameter and Orbit System - Orbit Computation (EPOS-OC)" software and the Altimeter Database and processing System (ADS, http://adsc.gfz-potsdam.de/ads/) developed at GFZ. The orbits were computed in the same (ITRF2008) terrestrial reference frame for all satellites using common, most precise models and standards available and described below. The ERS-1 orbit is computed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) and altimeter crossover data, while the ERS-2 orbit is derived using additionally Precise Range And Range-rate Equipment (PRARE) measurements. The Envisat, TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 orbits are based on Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) and SLR observations. The orbit files are available in the Extended Standard Product 3 Orbit Format (SP3-c, ftp://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov/igscb/data/format/sp3c.txt) Files are gzip-compressed. File names are given as sate_YYYYMMDD_SP3C.gz, where "sate" is the abbreviation (ENVI, ERS1, ERS2, JAS1, JAS2, TOPX) of the satellite name, YYYY stands for 4-digit year, MM stands for month and DD stands for day of the beginning of the file. More details on these orbits are provided in Rudenko et al. (2017)
# 2
Quinteros, Javier
Abstract: This service provides routing information for distributed data centres, in the case where multiple different seismic data centres offer access to data and products using compatible types of services. Examples of the data and product objects are seismic timeseries waveforms, station inventory, or quality parameters from the waveforms. The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA) is an example of a set of distributed data centres (the EIDA „nodes“). EIDA have offered Arclink and Seedlink services for many years, and now offers FDSN web services, for accessing their holdings. In keeping with the distributed nature of EIDA, these services could run at different nodes or elsewhere; even on computers from normal users. Depending on the type of service, these may only provide information about a reduced subset of all the available waveforms. To be effective, the Routing Service must know the locations of all services integrated into a system and serve this information in order to help the development of smart clients and/or services at a higher level, which can offer the user an integrated view of the entire system (EIDA), hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is intended to be open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication.
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