58 documents found in 424ms
# 1
Blanke, Aglaja • Kwiatek, Grzegorz • Martínez-Garzón, Patricia • Bohnhoff, Marco
Abstract: This data set is supplementary to the BSSA research article of Blanke et al. (2019), in which the local S-wave coda quality factor at The Geysers geothermal field, California, is investigated. Over 700 induced microseismic events recorded between June 2009 and March 2015 at 31 short-period stations of the Berkeley-Geysers Seismic Network were used to estimate the frequency-dependent coda quality factor (Q_C) using the method of Phillips (1985). A sensitivity analysis was performed to different input parameters (magnitude range, lapse time, moving window width, total coda length and seismic sensor component) to gain a better overview on how these parameters influence Q_C estimates. Tested parameters mainly show a low impact on the outcome whereas applied quality criteria like signal-to-noise ratio and allowed uncertainties of Q_C estimates were found to be the most sensitive factors. Frequency-dependent mean-Q_C curves were calculated from seismograms of induced earthquakes for each station located at The Geysers using the tested favored input parameters. The final results were tested in the context of spatio-temporal behavior of Q_C in the reservoir considering distance-, azimuth and geothermal production rate variations. A distance and azimuthal dependence was found which is related to the reservoir anisotropy, lithological-, and structural features. By contrast, variations in geothermal production rates do not influence the estimates. In addition, the final results were compared with previous estimated frequency-independent intrinsic direct S-wave quality factors (Q_D) of Kwiatek et al. (2015). A match of Q_D was observed with Q_C estimates obtained at 7 Hz center-frequency, suggesting that Q_D might not be of an intrinsic but of scattering origin at The Geysers. Additionally, Q_C estimates feature lower spreading of values and thus a higher stability. The Geysers geothermal field is located approximately 110 km northwest of San Francisco, California in the Mayacamas Mountains. It is the largest steam-dominated geothermal reservoir operating since the 1960s. The local seismicity is clearly related to the water injections and steam production with magnitudes up to ~5 occurring down to 5 km depth, reaching the high temperature zone (up to 360°C). The whole study area is underlain by a felsite (granitic intrusion) that shows an elevation towards the southeast and subsides towards northwest. A fracture network induces anisotropy into the otherwise isotropic rocks featuring different orientations. Moreover, shear-wave splitting and high attenuating seismic signals are observed and motivate to analyze the frequency-dependent coda quality factor. Two data sets were analyzed: one distinct cluster located in the northwest (NW) close to injection wells Prati-9 and Prati-29, and the other one southeast (SE) of The Geysers, California, USA, close to station TCH (38° 50′ 08.2″ N, 122° 49′ 33.7″ W and 38° 46′ 59.5″ N, 122° 44′ 13.2″ W, respectively). The frequency-dependent coda quality factor is estimated from the seismic S-wave coda by applying the moving window method and regression analysis of Phillips (1985). Different input parameters including moving widow width, lapse time and total coda length are used to obtain Q_C estimates and associated uncertainties. Within a sensitivity analysis we investigated the influence of these parameters and also of magnitude ranges and seismic sensor components on Q_C estimates. The coda analysis was performed for each event at each sensor component of each station. The seismograms were filtered in predefined octave-width frequency bands with center-frequencies ranging from 1-69 Hz. The moving window method was applied starting in the early coda (after the S-onset) for each frequency band measuring the decay of Power Spectral Density spectra. The decay of coda amplitudes was fitted with a regression line and Q_C estimates were calculated from its decay slope for each frequency band. In a final step a mean-Q_C curve was calculated for each available station within the study area resulting in different curves dependent on event location sites in the northwest and southeast. Data Description The data contain final mean-Q_C estimates of the NW and SE Geysers, coda Q estimates at 7 Hz center-frequency calculated by using the NW cluster, and initial direct Q estimates of Kwiatek et al. (2015) using the same data of the NW cluster. Table S1 shows final mean coda quality factor estimates obtained from the NW cluster at injection wells Prati-9 and Prati-29. The column headers show stations (station), center-frequencies of octave-width frequency bands in Hertz (f[Hz]), mean coda Q estimates (meanQc) and related standard deviations (std), all obtained by coda analysis. Table S2 shows the final mean coda quality factor estimates obtained from additional selected 100 events in the SE Geysers. Column headers correspond to those in Table S1. Table S3 shows coda Q estimates related to 7 Hz center-frequency. The column headers show stations (station), center-frequency of octave-width frequency bands in Hertz (f[Hz]), coda Q estimates at 7 Hz center-frequency (Q_C) and related standard deviations (std2sigma; 95% confidence level), all obtained by coda analysis. Table S4 shows selected direct S-wave quality factors of Kwiatek et al. (2015) obtained by spectral fitting. The column headers show stations (station) and direct S-wave Q estimates (Q_D). The four tables are provided in tab separated txt format. Tables S3 and S4 are used for a comparative study and displayed in Figure 12 of the BSSA article mentioned above.
# 2
Pick, Leonie • Korte, Monika
Abstract: The HMC (Hourly Magnetospheric Currents) index measures the activity of large-scale magnetospheric currents on Earth's surface from 1900 to 2015. It resolves the absolute intensity of low-frequency variations, especially at periods relevant to the solar cycle, more robustly than existing geomagnetic indices. HMC is based on hourly means of vector magnetic field measurements from 34 mid latitude geomagnetic observatories obtained from WDC Edinburgh (http://www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk/catalog/master.html). This data has been manually revised to correct for spikes, jumps and drifts. A detailed description of the derivation method is given in Pick et al., 2018 to which these data are supplementary material. This directory contains the HMC index (hmc1900phor.hor) and the modified observatory data that it is based on (data.zip). The index and the observatory data files are formatted in compliance with the IAGA-2002 ASCII exchange format (https://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vdat/IAGA2002/iaga2002format.html). Individual file names are composed of:[IAGA code of observatory] + [first active year during 1900-2015] + [p(provisional)] + [hor(hourly)] + [_mod(modified)].hor Also included is information on how the data modifications (list in modifications.pdf) were applied (readme.txt).
# 3
Corbi, Fabio • Sandri, Laura • Bedford, Jonathan • Funiciello, Francesca • Brizzi, Silvia • (et. al.)
Abstract: This data set includes the results of digital image correlation of one experiment on subduction megathrust earthquakes with interacting asperities performed at the Laboratory of Experimental Tectonics (LET) Univ. Roma Tre in the framework of AspSync, the Marie Curie project (grant agreement 658034) lead by F. Corbi in 2016-2017. Detailed descriptions of the experiments and monitoring techniques can be found in Corbi et al. (2017 and 2019) to which this data set is supplementary material. We here provide Digital Image Correlation (DIC) data relative to a 7 min long interval during which the experiment 
produces 40 seismic cycles with average duration of about 10.5 s (see Figure S1 in Corbi et al., 2019). The DIC analysis yields quantitative about the velocity field characterizing two consecutive frames, measured in this case at the model surface. For a detailed description of the experimental procedure, set-up and materials used, please refer to the article of Corbi et al. (2017) paragraph 2. This data set has been used for: a) studying the correlation between apparent slip-deficit maps and earthquake slip pattern (see Corbi et al., 2019; paragraph 4); and b) as input for the Machine Learning investigation (see Corbi et al., 2019; paragraph 5). Further technical information about the methods, data products and matlab scripts is proviced in the data description file. The list of files explains the file and folder structure of the data set.
# 4
Förster, Hans-Jürgen • Walsh, Nathanial John
Abstract: This data set is the third of a series reporting chemical data for accessory minerals from felsic igneous rocks. It compiles the results of electron-microprobe spot analyses of monazite-(Ce) from various Paleoproterozoic granitoids and spatially associated gneisses located in the wider Fort McMurray area in northeastern Alberta, Canada. The data were generated in connection with the Master of Science thesis of Nathanial John Walsh (Walsh 2013) at the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, but remained unpublished. The thesis was part of the Helmholtz - Alberta - Initiative (HAI) between the University of Alberta and the Helmholtz Association. Interestingly, monazite from the diverse basement rocks display various kinds of pattern with respect to composition and origin. The great bulk of measured grains display variably declined chondrite-normalized LREE patterns virtually free of anomalies indicative for significant fluid-induced overprinting. We have rocks characterized by largely unzoned, chemically homogeneous grains. There are as well rocks containing nicely patchy-zoned grains showing a wide range in composition, in particular regarding the Th/LREE proportions. Here, maximum measured Th concentration amounted to 33 wt% ThO2. Incorporation of Th into the crystal structure is almost exclusively governed by the huttonite substitution reaction, i.e., Th^4+ + Si^4+ = REE^3+ + P^5+, as characteristic for this chemical type of granites (Förster 1998). The suite of rocks also included samples containing small-sized inclusions of Th-poor monazite in apatite, which formed in response to metamorphic, fluid-aided dissolution-reprecipitation processes (Harlov and Förster 2003, Harlov et al. 2005). Finally, we have a quartz monzonite containing Th-poor monazite in apatite together with matrix monazite of normal Th concentration, the origin if which is not yet fully resolved (cf. Foerster-2018-004_monazite-alberta-BSE images.pdf. presenting back-scattered electron images of monazite grains). In brief, the data set provides information on several aspects of formation and alteration of monazite in non-metamorphic and metamorphic granite. The data set published here contains the complete pile of data acquired for monazite-(Ce) and back-scattered electron (BSE) images of many of the probed grains. Chemical data are provided as Excel and machine-readable .csv files, which contain the information listed in Table 1 of the data description file. Column headers in red (only in the Excel version) indicate that the data and information provided in these columns is from Walsh (2013). “0.00” means that the concentrations of the respective elements were measured, but were below their limits of detection. Blank boxes in oxide concentrations columns indicate that the respective elements were not sought. The collection of BSE images is presented as pdf.file. The sample and grain numbers are given below each mineral image and are corresponding to the Sample No. and the Grain No. in the data table. The thesis of N. Walsh "Walsh, N.J. (2013) Geochemistry and geochronology of the Precambrian basement domains in the vicinity of Fort MacMurray, Alberta: a geothermal perspective. Master of Science thesis, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada" is not available online.
# 5
Lu, Biao • Förste, Christoph • Barthelmes, Franz • Petrovic, Svetozar • Flechtner, Frank • (et. al.)
Abstract: With the successful completion of ESA's PolarGAP campaign, terrestrial gravimetry data (gravity anomalies) are now available for both polar regions. Therefore, it is now possible to overcome the GOCE polar gap by using real gravimetry data instead of some regularization methods. But terrestrial gravimetry data needs to become filtered to remove the high-frequency gravity information beyond spher. harm. degree e.g. 240 to avoid disturbing spectral leakage in the satellite-only gravity field models. For the gravity anomalies from the Arctic, we use existing global gravity field models (e.g., EGM2008) for this filtering. But for the gravity anomalies from Antarctica, we use local gravity field models based on a point mass modeling method to remove the high-frequency gravity information. After that, the boundary-value condition from Molodensky's theory is used to build the observation equations for the gravity anomalies. Finally, variance component estimation is applied to combine the normal equations from the gravity anomalies, from the GOCE GGs (e.g., IGGT_R1), from GRACE (e.g., ITSG-Grace2014s) and for Kaula's rule of thumb (higher degree/order parts) to build a global gravity field model IGGT_R1C without disturbing impact of the GOCE polar gap. This new model has been developed by German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Wuhan University (WHU) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). Parametersstatic model modelname IGGT_R1Cproduct_type gravity_fieldearth_gravity_constant 0.3986004415E+15radius 0.6378136460E+07max_degree 240norm fully_normalizedtide_system tide_freeerrors formal
# 6
Rudenko, Sergei • Schöne, Tilo • Esselborn, Saskia • Neumayer, Karl Hans
Abstract: The data set provides GFZ VER13 orbits of altimetry satellites: ERS-1 (August 1, 1991 - July 5, 1996),ERS-2 (May 13, 1995 - February 27, 2006),Envisat (April 12, 2002 - April 8, 2012),TOPEX/Poseidon (September 23, 1992 - October 8, 2005),Jason-1 (January 13, 2002 - July 5, 2013) andJason-2 (July 5, 2008 - April 5, 2015) derived at the time spans given at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (Potsdam, Germany) within the Sea Level phase 2 project of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative using "Earth Parameter and Orbit System - Orbit Computation (EPOS-OC)" software (Zhu et al., 2004) and the Altimeter Database and processing System (ADS, http://adsc.gfz-potsdam.de/ads/) developed at GFZ. The orbits were computed in the ITRF2014 terrestrial reference frame for all satellites using common, most precise models and standards available and described below. The ERS-1 orbit is computed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) and altimeter crossover data, while the ERS-2 orbit is derived using additionally Precise Range And Range-rate Equipment (PRARE) measurements. The Envisat, TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2 orbits are based on Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) and SLR observations. For Envisat, altimeter crossover data were used additionally at 44 of 764 orbital arcs with gaps in SLR and DORIS data. The orbit files are available in the Extended Standard Product 3 Orbit Format (SP3-c). Files are gzip-compressed. File names are given as sate_YYYYMMDD_SP3C.gz, where "sate" is the abbreviation (ENVI, ERS1, ERS2, JAS1, JAS2, TOPX) of the satellite name, YYYY stands for 4-digit year, MM for month and DD for day of the beginning of the file. More details on these orbits are provided in Rudenko et al. (2018) to which these orbits are supplementary material.
# 7
Pittore, Massimiliano • Haas, Michael • Megalooikonomou, Konstantinos
Abstract: The dataset contains a set of structural and non-structural attributes collected using the GFZ RRVS (Remote Rapid Visual Screening) methodology in Alsace, France, within the framework of the DESTRESS project. The survey has been carried out between May and June 2017 using a Remote Rapid Visual Screening system developed by GFZ and employing omnidirectional images from Google StreetView (vintage: February 2011) and footprints from OpenStreetMap.Surveyor: Konstantinos G. Megalooikonomou (GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences)The attributes are encoded according to the GEM taxonomy v2.0 (see https://taxonomy.openquake.org). The following attributes are defined (not all are observable in the RRVS survey):code,descriptionlon, longitude in fraction of degreeslat, latitude in fraction of degreesobject_id, unique id of the building surveyedMAT_TYPE,Material TypeMAT_TECH,Material TechnologyMAT_PROP,Material PropertyLLRS,Type of Lateral Load-Resisting SystemLLRS_DUCT,System DuctilityHEIGHT,HeightYR_BUILT,Date of Construction or RetrofitOCCUPY,Building Occupancy Class - GeneralOCCUPY_DT,Building Occupancy Class - DetailPOSITION,Building Position within a BlockPLAN_SHAPE,Shape of the Building PlanSTR_IRREG,Regular or IrregularSTR_IRREG_DT,Plan Irregularity or Vertical IrregularitySTR_IRREG_TYPE,Type of IrregularityNONSTRCEXW,Exterior wallsROOF_SHAPE,Roof ShapeROOFCOVMAT,Roof CoveringROOFSYSMAT,Roof System MaterialROOFSYSTYP,Roof System TypeROOF_CONN,Roof ConnectionsFLOOR_MAT,Floor MaterialFLOOR_TYPE,Floor System TypeFLOOR_CONN,Floor Connections
# 8
Rosenau, Matthias • Pohlenz, Andre • Kemnitz, Helga • Warsitzka, Michael
Abstract: This dataset provides friction data from ring-shear tests (RST) for a quartz sand (“G12”). This material is used in various types of analogue experiments in the Helmholtz Laboratory for Tectonic Modelling (HelTec) at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam for simulating brittle rocks in the upper crust. The material has been characterized by means of internal friction coefficients µ and cohesions C. According to our analysis the material shows a Mohr-Coulomb behaviour characterized by a linear failure envelope and peak, dynamic and reactivation friction coefficients of µP = 0.69, µD = 0.55 and µR = 0.62, respectively. Cohesions C are in the order of 50 – 110 Pa. The material shows a minor rate-weakening of <1% per ten-fold change in shear velocity. Further information about materical characteristics, measurement procedures, sample preparation, the RST (Ring-shear test) and VST (Velocity stepping test) procedure, as well as the analysed method is proviced in the data description file. The list of files explains the file and folder structure of the data set.
# 9
Anderson, James M. • Xu, Ming H.
Abstract: Plots of closure delay, closure phase, and closure amplitude are provided for the geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Continuous VLBI Campaign 2014 (CONT14) experiment of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, https://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/ , see https://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/program/cont14/ for a description of CONT14, and see https://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/about/org/components/dc-list.html for a list of IVS data centers from which the CONT14 data can be downloaded) as calculated by Anderson and Xu for their article titled _Source Structure and Measurement Noise Are as Important as All Other Residual Sources in Geodetic VLBI Combined_, submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research - Solid Earth in 2018. Closure quantities are insensitive to station-based calibration terms, such as station clock errors, atmospheric delay errors, phase offsets, station position errors, amplitude calibration errors, and so on, and as a result are sensitive only to source structure (the two-dimensional brightness distribution of source emission on the sky, which is typically time and frequency dependent), measurement noise, and closure errors such as bandpass mismatch and polarization leakage. We used closure quantities derived from the CONT14 data to investigate the amount of source structure present in the celestial sources observed in the CONT14 experiment. Details: Three data files are included:(1) closure_delay_Anderson_Xu_JGR_2018.tar.gz(2) closure_phase_Anderson_Xu_JGR_2018.tar.gz(3) closure_amplitude_Anderson_Xu_JGR_2018.tar.gz The file with the name starting with "closure_delay" contains closure delay plots, the file with the name starting with "closure_phase" contains closure phase plots, and so on. These three files are collections of files made by the UNIX tar program that have been compressed with the gzip program.
# 10
Heimann, Sebastian • Isken, Marius • Kühn, Daniela • Sudhaus, Henriette • Steinberg, Andreas • (et. al.)
Abstract: Grond is an open source software tool for robust characterization of earthquake sources. Moment tensors and finite fault rupture models can be estimated from a combination of seismic waveforms, waveform attributes and geodetic observations like InSAR and GNSS. It helps you to investigate diverse magmatic, tectonic, and other geophysical processes at all scales. It delivers meaningful model uncertainties through a Bayesian bootstrap-based probabilistic joint inversion scheme. The optimisation explores the full model space and maps model parameter trade-offs with a flexible design of objective functions. Rapid forward modelling is enabled by using pre-computed Green's function databases, handled through the Pyrocko software library. They serve synthetic near-field surface displacements and synthetic seismic waveforms for arbitrary earthquake source models and geometries.
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